This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Digital Services Act / Digital Markets Act'.


 
 
  
Ex-ante platform regulation 
Position paper 
“Regulating Systemic Digital Platforms” 
 
Key messages  
Schibsted is an international media g
  roup w
  ith w
  orld-class S
  candinavian m
  edia h
  ouses, l eading 
international  marketplaces  and  tech  start-ups  in the field of personal finance and col aborative 
economies.  Mil ions  of  people  interact  with  Schibsted  companies  every  day,  and  our  digital 
services a
  im t o empower c
  onsumers. ​S
  chibsted constitutes an e
  cosystem o
  f v
  arious b
  rands t hat 
offer different products and services to users and customers, and where we utilize data a
  cross 
the  ecosystem both to attract users and customers, develop and personalise our products and 
services as wel  as keep users and customers engaged.  
In  our  business  we  see  how  crucial  a  wel -functioning  digital  economy  and  a  fair  competitive 
environment online is. It is also a key element in the development of the Digital Single Market. 
We  are  of  the  opinion  that  in  order  to  ensure a level playing field for European businesses in 
competition  with  large  international  platforms,  there  is  a  need  to  ensure  that  there  is efficient 
and fair competition on the European digital market. 
As we have stated in our ​position paper on competition policy we a
  re of t he s
  trong opinion t hat 
EU  competition  policy  should  be  developed  in  order  to  effectively  ​combat  anti-competitive 
practises
 in digital markets and al ow d
  igital c
  ompanies t o c
  ompete o
  n t heir o
  wn m
  erits. I n o
  rder 
to  realize  this  purpose,  there  is  a  need  to  modernize  current  competition  rules  in  light  of  the 
development  of  digital  markets  and to ensure that data positions are taken into account in the 
determination of market p
  ower. Moreover, i t i s i mportant t o ​give E
  uropean p
  layers t he p
  ossibility 
to  col aborate  with  local  and  regional  players  -  in  order  to  compete  with  the  large  global 
platforms. 
In  addition,  there  is  also  a  need  to  introduce  a  limited  ​ex  ante  regulation  to  complement 
competition  law  enforcement.  Such  regulation  must  be  directed  specifical y  towards  certain 
large international platforms, for which traditional c
  ompetition law e
  nforcement h
  as o
  ften proved 
too slow and inefficient.  
The  purpose  of  the  ex  ante  regulation  should be to strike directly at the business models that 
m​ake certain global platforms so p
  owerful. T
  he regulation should establish clear rules t o p
  rotect 
the dynamism of the markets as wel  as consumers and the media ecosystem.   
 
Furthermore, in order to strengthen scrutiny of the digital markets o
  veral , the EU should create 
a  European  Digital  Authority to ensure efficient and consistent monitoring and enforcement  of 
such inter​national platforms.  



 
 
 
Background  
 
Giant  global  digital  platforms  are  at  the  heart  of  the  economy.  Consumers  rely  on  them  to 
access  information  and  businesses  need  them  to  access  users  and  user  data,  to  promote 
services and general y t o operate m
  ore e
  fficiently. As a
  d
  igital- a
  nd m
  edia c
  ompany, we strongly 
believe that these platforms are an e
  ssential p
  art o
  f the e
  conomy and can c
  reate g
  reat b
  usiness 
opportunities, valuable innovation and useful choices for consumers. 
 
However, due to the positions and market power of certain g
  lobal p
  latforms, w
  e s
  imultaneously 
experience unfair and uncompetitive practices such as:  
 
 
● Google: Google's position and behaviour represents a h
  uge chal enge i n our d
  ay to d
  ay 
operations,  in  particular  for  our  ads  business  which  is  crucial  for  the  financing  of 
independent journalism.  
 
● Facebook:  By  tying  separate  services  together  through  functional  integration,  and 
favouring its own s
  ervices t o the detriment of c
  ompetition on t he m
  erits, i t h
  as b
  oosted i ts 
own  Facebook  Marketplace  classifieds  service  to  an  unprecedented  growth  by 
leveraging its social network to drive ads and traffic to that service. 
 
● Apple:  It  requires  certain  digital  services  (including  some  of  Schibsted’s  news  media 
apps) to exclusively implement Apple’s p
  ayment system (
  IAP). T
  hose s
  ervices t hat h
  ave 
implemented  IAP  become customers of Apple and are therefore not able to establish a 
customer  relationship  with  and  col ect  data  about  customers  that  have  purchased  an 
online  news  subscription  through  their  apps  as  the  subscriptions  are  ful y  handled  by 
Apple.   
 
 
Another  chal enging  example,  which  relates  to  several  of  the  global  platforms  that  are  also 
operating as browsers is tracking prevention. Apple Safari and, going f orward, G
  oogle C
  hrome, 
wil  have extensive restrictions for third party tracking.  While t he i ntentions -
   to p
  rotect p
  rivacy - 
may  be  good,  in  practice  the  browsers  take  upon  the  role  as  gatekeepers  and  decide  which 
companies can col ect data and how col ected data can be used.  
 
We welcome that the E
  U Commission d
  uring t he p
  ast years h
  as actively been p
  ursuing s
  ome o
  f 
the harmful behaviour w
  e e
  xperience f rom g
  lobal platforms. However, t here a
  re s
  til  some c
  ases 
being  investigated  and  we  urge  the  Commission  to  open  formal  proceedings  in  particular 
against  Apple  and  Facebook  Marketplaces  as  soon  as  possible.  We  also  cal   on  the 
Commission to look into the activities by Google on digital a
  dvertising a
  nd c
  onsent policies a
  nd 
thoroughly review how Google's practices impact the European media sector.  





 
 
● Third-party businesses are dependent on the SDP for access to a significant amount of 
users on the “other” side of the market (unavoidable trading partner). This represents  a 
kind of bottleneck power that g
  ives t he SDP, f or instance, t he a
  bility t o c
  harge e
  xcessive 
intermediation / access fees,  and / or exhibit abusive negotiation power for e
  xample by 
imposing unfair conditions on their business users; and  
 
● There are demonstrable network effects in a majority of EU Member States as t he S
  DP 
can  leverage  its  market power over one market to enter and compete in other different 
markets. This leveraging produces exclusionary effects and thus reduces competition t o 
the detriment of consumers.  
 
 
 
Proposed principles  
 
 
 
 
The  objective  of  the  regulation  should  be  to  establish  a  set  of  principles  that  ensure  market 
contestability,  consumer  choice  and  innovation.  It  should  address  specific  “systemic”  abusive 
practices  in  order  to  provide  legal  certainty  for  businesses,  platforms  and  enforcement 
authorities alike. In order for the regulation to be future-proof it must be flexible enough t o t ake 
into account developments in the market.  
 
The ex ante regulation should establish the fol owing principles: 
 
● Predictability, fairness and transparency​:  
 
The SDPs should be obligated to ensure that the rules they apply f or access t o a
  nd u
  se 
of  their  platforms  and  services  are  general y  fair,  predictable  and  transparent.  This 
includes: 
 
-
SDPs  should  be  prohibited from imposing services that are ancil ary to the core 
intermediation services they are offering, such as payment services. 
 
-
SDPs  should  be  prohibited  from  in  effect  hindering  competitors'  access  to  or 
effective  use  of  their  services  by  harmful  self-preferencing  of  the  SDPs  own 
and/or control ed products or services. Instead, SDPs m
  ust ensure f air a
  ccess t o 
and ability to use their services based on the merits; and 
 
-
SDPs  should  be  mandated  to  ensure  complete  transparency  into  how  their 
algorithms disseminate advertising and content. 
 
 
● Access to third-party customer data​:  
 
-
SDPs  should  not  be  al owed  to  refuse  businesses  operating  on  their  platforms 
access  to  data  relating  to  the  respective  businesses’  own  services,  the 



 
 
businesses’  use  of  the  platforms  or  services  and/or  access  to  data  about  the 
businesses´consumers.  
 
-
Moreover,  SDPs  should  not  be al owed to dictate the terms for how businesses 
can access and  process data about the respective businesses’ users. 
 
Enforcement 
 
To ensure European harmonization a
  nd r
  egulatory e
  fficiency a
  nd t o  monitor t he s
  peed a
  t w
  hich 
digital  markets  evolve,  SDPs  should  be  under  the  supervision  of  a  single  European  Digital 
Authority or a new body established within the EU Commission. 
 
A  new, purpose-built EU Digital Authority should be established and in charge of enforcing the 
ex ante regulation. The Authority would be tasked with determining which companies fal  within 
the  criteria  for  SDPs.  It  is  important  that  this  decision  is  made  on  EU  level  in  order  to  avoid 
national fragmentation. 
 
The  Authority  should  also  have  supervisory  powers  in  order  to  monitor  the  compliance of the 
principles and i nvestigative powers to g
  et information f rom t he S
  DPs on h
  ow they implement t he 
Regulation. 
 
In  addition,  the  Authority  should  have  the  possibility  to  impose  remedies  in  order  to  sanction 
those SDPs that fail to fulfil  the requirements of this Regulation.