Detta är en HTML-version av en bilaga till begäran om allmän handling 'Digital Services Act / Digital Markets Act'.



 
 
 
POSITION PAPER 
 
12/10/20 
 
 
 
 
The Digital Services Package 
 
KEY

 
 MESSAGES 
 
•  The  eCommerce  Directive  has  greatly  contributed  to  the  growth  of  Europe’s 
economy,  yet  the  online  landscape  in  which  it  was  adopted  has  greatly  changed. 
Shaping a framework that takes this into consideration must protect both consumers 
and the competitiveness of business users. The value of the online ecosystem lies 
in its ability to operate quickly at scale. 
•  Clarity on which types of digital services and definitions of what goods/content are to 
be covered are required. The framework should be upgraded to apply to 3rd country 
services that are not established in the EU but offering services within it. 
•  Clear, fast and harmonised mechanisms are needed to support the removal of illegal 
goods  and  content  online.  Further  novel  measures  should  be  considered  to 
incentivise platforms into maintaining diligent processes of active engagement.  
•  A clear notion of what is an illegal good/content is needed. This cannot be a “one-
size-fits-all” definition and should instead be tailored based on specific, existing EU 
and  national  legislation.  The  notion  of  legal  but  “harmful”  content  should  not  be 
defined or legislated for at the risk of breaching fundamental rights. 
•  Platforms achieving a so called “gatekeeper” position are not necessarily abusing 
that position. However it can take place through carrying out activities that impede 
effective competition. Contestability of these platforms by others through truly open 
markets should be the goal. 
•  Clarity as to which platforms are considered "gatekeepers" as well as the criteria as 
to  how  these  characteristics  should  be  measured  are  required.  Appropriate  and 
practicable  thresholds  would  avoid  overregulation  on  smaller  platforms  that  serve 
only niche markets. 
•  Any new ex-ante mechanism should have a solid due process and governance model 
to  avoid  legal  uncertainty  and  arbitrary  decisions  in  order  to  keep  the  spirit  of  the 
existing competition framework.  
•  Consumer welfare must remain the ultimate goal. As markets are rapidly evolving 
with  the  state  of  technology  any  new  mechanism  should  remain  future-proof  and 
technology neutral.  
•  The Commission should continue to map the situation and policy responses across 
Member  States  to  develop  a  repository  of  practices  to  better  understand  the 
commonalities and differences of platform workers across the single market and then 
carry out tripartite discussions on this topic. 
 
 
 
BUSINESSEUROPE a.i.s.b.l. 
AVENUE DE CORTENBERGH 168 – BE 1000 BRUSSELS – BELGIUM 
TEL +32 (0)2 237 65 11 – FAX +32 (0)2 231 14 45 – E-MAIL xxxx@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx.xx 
 
WWW.BUSINESSEUROPE.EU – Follow us on Twitter @BUSINESSEUROPE 
EU Transparency register 3978240953-79 
 


 
THE 
DIGITAL 
SERVICES 
PACKAGE: 
ILLEGAL 
GOODS/CONTENT, 
“GATEKEEPER” PLATFORMS AND PLATFORM WORKERS  
 
 
CONTEXT 
 
The  eCommerce  Directive  has  successfully  promoted  online  commerce  and  the 
development of the platform economy in Europe. It has also offered new opportunities 
for businesses, particularly SMEs, to participate in the wider global economy. In turn, this 
has fostered knock-on effects for growth, innovation and the development of services for 
other  economic  sectors.  The  Directive  has  therefore  greatly  contributed  to  Europe’s 
economic activity. We have defended the internal market provisions of this Directive (see 
BusinessEurope’s separate paper here) and believe that the country-of-origin principle 
within the eCommerce Directive should not be opened as it represents a cornerstone of 
the Single Market. Key Single Market provisions of the directive should be preserved.  
 
However, we recognise that the context in which the eCommerce Directive was adopted 
is different to the current state of play. The sheer size, importance and influence of the 
online economy has meant that rogue actors have utilised platforms in order to distribute 
illegal goods and content online. It is therefore useful to revisit this framework, align it 
with EU case law and ensure the online sale of fake, counterfeit or dangerous goods and 
content  is  tackled  effectively,  particularly  when  (exterritorial)  enforcement  of  product 
safety laws against non-compliant products entering the EU market have been difficult 
to address. 
 
Some  platforms  have  also  emerged  with  stronger  market  positions  in  the  digital 
economy. While dominant players are permitted, the monitoring of markets must ensure 
effective competition, consumer welfare, the creation of innovation and ensure that no 
barriers  for  market  entry  exist  within  the  markets  in  which  they  operate.  It  is  also 
important to tackle problems related to interoperability and portability for business users 
(see BusinessEurope’s paper on the data strategy on this regard).  
 
The update of the safe harbour regime for digital services providers should take other 
legislative measures impacting this initiative into account to avoid risk of overlapping or 
conflicting  provisions  (eg.  the  Copyright  Directive,  Platform  to  Business  Regulation, 
Goods Package, Audio-visual Media Services Directive, VAT Reforms and the ongoing 
discussion  surrounding  the  Terrorist  Online  Content  Regulation).  Any  revision  of  the 
eCommerce  Directive  should  ensure  broad  harmonisation,  maximum  certainty  for 
businesses,  a  level  playing  field  for  all  and  effective  enforcement,  including  those 
companies outside the EU offering their services in the single market. 
 
We also understand that the Commission is taking the opportunity to consult on issues 
related  to  platform  workers’  rights  as  self-employed  people  providing  services  for  the 
platform economy. It is important to approach the topic of platform work from a broad 
perspective eg. not only related to social affairs. Furthermore, it is important to realise 
that the issues currently under discussion are not specific to platforms – they relate to 
self-employed persons more generally. As already made clear in the agreement on the 
directive on transparent and predictable working conditions, it is for Member States and 
 



 
social partners to decide how to define different types of work and categories of workers. 
This should be done in a way which ensures legal clarity, takes account of new forms of 
work and is future-proof. It should also be in line with competition policy rules, and their 
interpretation by the European Court of Justice1.  
 
As a key societal stakeholder, BusinessEurope outlines its reaction to the Commission’s 
consultation on the Digital Services Package in relation to tackling illegal content online, 
gatekeeper platforms and platform workers, below: 
 
 

1.  TACKLING ILLEGAL GOODS/CONTENT ONLINE: 
 
The  policy  maker must  take  consideration  of  both:  protection  of  European  consumers 
and competitiveness for business users; while keeping innovative services that citizens 
expect and fostering opportunities for new business models to develop. The value of the 
online ecosystem lies in its ability to operate quickly and at scale. Measures should be 
effective, practicable and proportionate so as to not detriment their benefit to consumers, 
businesses and society alike. 
 
Scope: 
 
As  the  DSA  intends  to  update  the  eCommerce  Directive  and  target  this  framework 
towards removing various types of illegal goods & content online, it is crucial that clear 
definitions  and  categories  exist  as  to  what  is  being  covered  so  that  respective 
responsibilities are understood. It should also be clear as to what is meant by a platform 
(intermediary)  covered  under  these  new  rules.  It  should  have  clear  definitions  to 
determine what “content”, “services” and “product” we refer to in this instance. We need 
legal clarity but also avoidance of   unnecessary burdens for sectors not intended to be 
included (e.g. logistics, transport). 
 
We  also  call  on  the  Commission  to  recognise  the  diversity  of  platforms  (clearly 
differentiating  between those  who  play  an  active  or  a  passive role  with  respect  to  the 
information they distribute, share or host) spell out the services or activities not intended 
to be in scope of the proposed measures. A one-size-fits-all approach that would apply 
similar rules to all online services, regardless of their business model, societal impact or 
risk  profile  in  the  dissemination  of  illegal  content,  would  damage  the  broader  data 
economy. 
 
Further to this, we agree that the framework should be upgraded to apply to 3rd country 
services that are not established in the EU but offering services within it. These services 
should  be  obliged  to  have  a  digital  representative,  particularly  as  the  most  popular 
platforms used by EU consumers are not based in the EU. Geographical location bears 
little significance when these goods and services can be accessed by EU citizens online 
at distance. 
 
Notice and take-down: 
 
1 C-692/19 concerning the status of platform workers in the UK working for Yodel delivery network, 
the ECJ ruled that it is for national courts to make decisions about workers' employment status 
and that in this case, the worker had been correctly classified as self-employed 
 



 
 
The  ability  to  bring  actions  against  platforms  must  be  a  key  factor  in  ensuring  the 
sustainability  of  the  digital  economy.  However,  notice  and  takedown  procedures,  the 
main tool for  removing  illegal  content,  remain fragmented  across  the  EU.  This means 
that procedures can differ from one intermediary to another, including: the speed of the 
responsiveness,  the  information  required  from  the  intermediary,  the  information  to  be 
provided throughout the takedown process (eg. acknowledgment of receipt of the notice, 
confirmation of takedown, information about the measures taken). The role of the DSA 
should  therefore  reinforce  the  cascade  of  responsibilities  in  fighting  illegal  content, 
stressing  that  clear,  fast  and  harmonised  mechanisms  are  defined  for  the  removal  of 
illegal content. It would be appropriate to harmonise notice and takedown procedures as 
the primary instrument in the removal of illegal content in the EU by indicating criteria for 
notices  of  illegal  content.  The  clearer  the  conditions  for  illegal  content,  the  better  and 
faster the response from platforms. 
 
The awareness of illegal content should trigger a straightforward obligation to remove or 
block access to such content after obtaining this knowledge. The update of the existing 
eCommerce Directive should  therefore  preserve liability for  platforms that have actual 
specific knowledge of the illegal content (eg. through receiving a notice) but then failed 
to act (eg. by not removing or blocking access to specific illegal content). While failure to 
keep  the  content  down  indefinitely  should  not  lead  to  immediate  liability  for  the 
intermediary if the previous notice was reasonably followed, “best efforts to prevent their 
future upload” in accordance with “high industry standards” as per Article 17(4)(c) of the 
Copyright Directive could be a useful principle for platforms to follow to prevent the re-
upload of illegal content. Liability should only feature however if “best efforts” cannot be 
demonstrated or another notice was issued on the basis of the re-upload and then not 
followed. 
 
We therefore agree that novel measures for services to tackle illegal content should also 
be  considered  in  the  revision  of  this  framework.  This  approach  should  incentivise 
platforms to ensure processes of active engagement to keep illegal goods and content 
from their services. As a result, we support the strengthening of existing overarching EU 
coordination  groups  (eg.  Member  State  eCommerce  coordination  group)  to  support 
national authorities in collecting evidence to check and  proportionately penalise those 
that  do  not  have  necessary  processes  in  place  to  be  in  a  position  to  obtain  “actual 
knowledge” themselves to remove illegal goods/content or effectively enforce the terms 
& conditions of their services.  
 
What is deemed satisfactory should be based on a broad diligence assessment of the 
platform (eg. processes adopted, dedicated employees, combination of cases). It will be 
important  to  take  into  account  the  ultimate  goal:  the  creation  of  a  healthy  digital 
environment  in  which  illegal  contents  or  goods  are  removed  promptly.  Regular  and 
proportionate transparency reporting on the removal of illegal goods/content could aid 
businesses to demonstrate adherence to this general responsibility.  Provisions should 
also seek to consider how they could impact smaller businesses, considering their limited 
resources to proactively take action in comparison to larger companies; a proportionate 
approach should be taken. If certain processes are found to be sub-optimal, constructive 
regulatory engagement with the intermediary should take place to improve the situation 
before penalties are given. 
 
Some  platforms  are  often  involved  in  the  actual  transaction  itself  (eg.  stocking, 
transportation)  where  it  is  difficult  to  distinguish  the  platform  from  the  business  user. 
 



 
However, a commercial relationship does already exist to organise those services. We 
therefore support a “Know Your Business Customer” responsibility to be established to 
incentivise platforms to further use this necessary information to identify their customers 
in  order  to  create  a  safer  online  business  environment.  Again,  these  new  provisions 
should take the limited resources of smaller businesses into account. 
 
However, provisions should be proportionate and only apply to active platforms. There 
should  only  be  liability  for  passive  mere  conduit,  caching  and  hosting  services  where 
positive knowledge arises due to an intermediary being notified or where they have taken 
active measures and become aware but then failed to act sufficiently. Otherwise, there 
should be no liability for passive services. The distinction between service categories in 
Article 14 of the eCommerce Directive should be upheld and complemented by additional 
criteria aimed at clarifying the passive nature of these services. For example, keyword 
advertising for trademarks cannot easily be classified as a host provider as current terms 
have  fallen  behind  the  times  linguistically.  In  particular,  this  criteria  should  take  into 
account the actual risk presented by, whether the service provider has any control over 
the  content  being  published  or  possesses  the  technical  capabilities  to  access  users’ 
specific  content  that  is  otherwise  not  public.  In  some  cases,  a  business  user  maybe 
obliged to maintain full control of the content and services they operate. 
 
This should be coordinated with existing laws to ensure coherence (e.g. the Copyright 
Directive,  the  revised  Audiovisual  Media  Services  Directive  and  the  proposal  for  a 
Regulation  on  Terrorist  Content  Online).  The  flexibility  of  this  approach  would  allow 
provisions to evolve over time and enable a differentiated approach through guidance 
based on the nature of the applicable service or content. 
 
Providing platforms with more responsibility to remove illegal content can only take place 
with clarity on which content is actual y deemed “il egal” and which services it needs to 
be  removed  from.  Only  then  can  they  exercise  further  responsibility  to  meaningfully 
remove that content.  
 
Illegal content: 
 
The spread of illegal online activity continues to cause societal harm. We support the 
principle of: “what is il egal offline must also be il egal online”. What could help business 
is a clear notion of what il egal content is in a harmonised manner. This cannot be a “one-
size-fits-all” definition however and should instead be tailored based on specific EU and 
national legislation. 
 
Online platforms have made some steps to reduce illegal content that is online, the scale 
and pace of technological change has also permitted growth of illegal goods and content 
online. Online platforms have however invested in technologies, processes and people 
to  protect  consumers  and  businesses  alike.  They  have  developed  tools  to  monitor 
activities to detect certain types of illegal content. However, it is important to realise that 
these types of aids are still a long way off replicating human judgement which itself is not 
infallible either.  
 
Consumer flagging can play an important role and some online platforms already offer 
this possibility to promote a positive user experience. While  community standards are 
important, it is ultimately up to authorities to decide what is actually illegal. Courts should 
also  continue  to  play  an  essential  role  in  both  interpreting  and  shaping  the  legal 
 



 
framework  and  decisions  on  which  platforms  rely  and  resolving  disputes  that  arise. 
Clarity on what content is deemed to be illegal would help all actors and bring the crucial 
legal certainty needed. 
 
In  order to meaningfully prevent, remove  and  disable  access to  illegal  content  online, 
platforms should be required to adopt clear terms and conditions that express that the 
sale or promotion of illegal goods and content is prohibited and will give rise to sanctions. 
Online platforms should know the identities of their business users too (see more on the 
“Know Your Business Customer” responsibility above). In the context of transparency, 
we  also  suggest  that  the  injured  party  should  be  provided  with  the  infringer's  contact 
details in order to enable the seamless enforcement of legal claims. 
 
Transparency is also important for business users who have placed the content online 
that  is  subsequently  deemed  illegal  either  by  an  authority  or  an  online  intermediary. 
Information as to why the content was deemed illegal and as a result taken down should 
be clearly and rapidly conveyed to the business user. The procedure envisaged in the 
platform-to-business Regulation could offer an efficient procedure of notice to draw upon.  
 
Lawful but harmful content: 
 
The notion of legal but “harmful” content should not be defined or legislated under the 
DSA. This would tip the balance of protecting consumers and businesses from harm and 
instead  breach  fundamental  rights  such  as:  human  dignity,  freedom  of  expression, 
freedom of association, freedom to do business and potentially breach privacy. Instead, 
the focus should be on describing a clearer definition of what illegal content is in order to 
solve these greater societal damages. This would also give clearer responsibilities for 
those involved in its removal. Otherwise, widening these responsibilities also to “harmful” 
content would not only take the benefit of these efforts away but inadvertently restrict the 
rights of EU citizens and potentially 3rd country citizens when applied ex-territorially.  
 
While it could be difficult to legally define “harmful” (but not il egal) content, we recognise 
the  potential  issue  of  fragmentation  at  national  level  if  Member  States  move  to  adopt 
multiple  different  initiatives  on  similar  subjects  in  this  area.  Self-  and  co-regulatory 
initiatives at the EU level, including the EU Code of Practice on Disinformation have been 
a  first  step.  Other  initiatives  such  as  the  European  democracy  action  plan  have  the 
opportunity to deal further with the issue of harmful content online. 
 
 
2.  EX-ANTE REGULATION FOR “GATEKEEPER” PLATFORMS: 
 
Online platforms have become a vital part of the digital economy. Many consumers and 
businesses users benefit from the various services they offer. By bringing together large 
number of different users and offering enabling technology, platforms have been able to 
develop the digital economy and lower the costs of doing business at scale. They have 
incentives to maintain user trust on both sides to ensure engagement.  
 
In some  cases,  such  platforms  are  achieving  a  so  called “gatekeeper”  position.  While 
some platforms are considered to be in this so cal ed “gatekeeper” position, it does not 
automatically  mean  they  are  systematically  abusing  such  position.  Abuse  of  a 
“gatekeeper” position can take place through carrying out activities that impede effective 
 



 
competition  through  creating  market  failures  or  lock-in  effects.  Lock-in  effects  can 
generate difficulties for business users who want to change the platform they are utilising 
or have no alternative.  
 
The aim of the Commission should be to ensure contestability of digital markets by other 
players. Markets should also be open and contestable to new entrants in all aspects. We 
should also understand how certain contractual terms or practices imposed by so called 
“gatekeeper” platforms may impact fair competition within a specific market.  
 
However, it is unclear which platforms the Commission considers to be a "gatekeeper" 
as well as the criteria as to how these characteristics should be measured. Appropriate 
and practicable thresholds for the scope of application could be useful, in order to avoid 
that other smaller platforms serving only niche markets are regulated in an unbalanced 
manner  at  the  same  time  (eg.  specific  industrial  platforms  that  have  different  market 
realities  to  the  wider  platform  economy  due  to  their  high  degree  of  specialisation  and 
more closed nature). Scalability and the network effects derived from the intermediary 
should be the focus.  
 
In this regard, thorough and efficient application of existing competition rules, that aim at 
demand markets to be open to new entrants, is of paramount importance. The principle 
of undistorted competition within markets provides the freedom for any market players 
to  develop  and  expand  their  businesses  and  the  emergence  of  new  products  and 
services. Competition rules are designed to safeguard this principle by sanctioning non-
competitive actions from inside and outside of markets, eg. abusive market behaviour of 
dominant global market players and by ensuring the absence of interventions of public 
authorities in functioning markets.  In particular, the ex-post control mechanism for the 
abuse of a dominant position, as laid down in Article 102 of the Treaty on the functioning 
of the European Union (TFEU), allows for undistorted competition within markets while 
also tackling abusive behaviour in general through benchmarks set by the case-by-case 
decisions. The ex-post design of the control mechanism ensures that authorities do not 
intervene  in  functioning  market  process  unless  a  non-competitive  disruption  of  these 
processes or market failure has been proven. 
 
However,  there  is  some  concern  that  some  of  the  markets  on  which  these  global 
platforms  are  active  have  tipped  in  response  to  the  rapid  emergence  of  the  digital 
economy. Moreover, there is a concern not only that customers and competitors may be 
exploited  but  that  new  players  may  struggle  to  enter these  markets  and neighbouring 
markets which in turn could be hampering the emergence of new products and services 
which  could  otherwise  benefit  European  consumers.  There  is  a  concern  that  the 
behaviour of powerful global online platforms could be exacerbating the current situation 
through the use of certain contractual terms or practices.  Against this background, we 
welcome the opportunity to contribute to the debate on the basis of these concerns as 
well  as  on  how  to  address  these  alleged  challenges  through  an  ex-ante  regulation  of 
“gatekeeper” platforms. 
 
Any new rules or mechanisms should have solid evidence, due process and governance 
in this regard to avoid legal uncertainty and arbitrary decisions in order to keep the spirit 
of  the  existing  framework.  The  relationship  of  a  possible  ex-ante  regulation  for 
gatekeeper platforms with the proposals being consulted on in parallel for a potentially 
New Competition Tool and existing regulation needs to be clarified. Clear criteria defining 
 



 
what  a  “gatekeeper”  intermediary  is  should  also  be  required  so  that  predictability  is 
supported and the growth of an intermediary is not deterred due to uncertainty. It should 
be  clear  that  the  potential  ex-ante  regulation  will  only  apply  to  platforms  acting  as 
“gatekeeper”. 
 
Consumers welfare must remain the ultimate goal. As markets are rapidly evolving with 
the state of technology any new mechanism should remain future-proof and technology 
neutral. End-users should be provided with an improved freedom of choice by preventing 
operator  selection  of  the  content  and  services  available  on  their  devices.  This  can  be 
achieved through avoiding commercial and technological barriers that limit the effect of 
competition and innovation in the market. 
 
The  Commission  needs  to  acknowledge  that,  although  there  is  no  one-size-fits-all 
approach, general evidence based ex-ante rules for gatekeeping platforms in the online 
world  may  be  useful.  At  the  same  time,  the  Commission  needs  to  also  consider  that 
network effects are not the same for platforms with  localised offers that are subject to 
local legislation and therefore limit network effects in practice.  
 
Further to the comments above on the specific ex-ante mechanism, in line with its Data 
Strategy,  BusinessEurope  also  calls  on  the  European  Commission  to  swiftly  move 
forward in creating its proposed European Data Spaces and facilitating voluntary data 
pooling.  Drawing  on  GDPR  Art  20,  user-centric  data  mobility  mechanisms  can  lower 
barriers to entry, facilitate users’ multi-homing and therefore alleviate concerns related 
to accumulation and monopolisation of data.  
 
 

3.  PLATFORM WORKERS: 
 
The EU should encourage Member States, while taking rulings of the CJEU and relevant 
national court decisions into account, to assess the different characteristics of workers 
to  determine  whether  they  are  more  appropriately  classified  as  an  employee  or  self-
employed and therefore by which labour law and social protection requirements they are 
covered.  
The labour markets and social security systems across the EU are equipped differently 
in each Member State when it comes to  new forms of work. Therefore, platform work 
must  be  dealt  with  within  the  context  of  national  legislation.  The  EU  has  already 
established legal instruments to ensure that those people working in new forms of work, 
for example on platforms, can be protected. It is now a matter of proper implementation 
and enforcement at national level. An EU legislative initiative on platform work is neither 
necessary nor appropriate for the following reasons: 

The  recently  agreed  EU  legislation  on  transparent  and  predictable  working 
conditions  already  has  minimum  provisions  targeted  at  people  working  on 
platforms who are categorised as employees, i.e. related to the provisions on ‘on-
demand work’.  

Member 
States 
should 
implement, 
where 
necessary 
the 
Council 
Recommendation  on  access  to  social  protection,  including  relating  to  self-
employed.  

The  recently  agreed  regulation  on  promoting  fairness  and  transparency  for 
business  users  of  online  intermediation  services,  the  so-called  “Platform  to 
 



 
Business (P2B) Regulation”, already places obligations on platforms to be more 
transparent about their terms and conditions towards the business users of the 
platforms,  including  regarding  ranking  systems  (for  those  platforms  that  have 
them), and to provide an internal complaint handing system. 

With the  increased transparency  on terms  and  conditions  and  other  measures 
provided by the P2B regulation, self-employed individuals working on platforms 
will have more information to enable them to choose which one to use.   
 
Many  people  wish  to  work  in  a  self-employed  capacity  as  they  are  not  bound  by 
contractual  obligations  towards  an  employer  and  they  have  flexibility  to  organise  and 
control  their  own  schedule,  develop  their  own  business  etc.  This  is  also  true  for  self-
employed. Furthermore, this is consistent with promoting measures against undeclared 
work, which has a negative impact on employees and the economy in general in terms 
eg. tax collection. 
 
If you have well-functioning labour markets within which different legal statuses are well 
framed  at  national  level,  being  self-employed  is normally  a  positive  choice  you make. 
Clarity  must  also  be  found  at  national  level  regarding  the  rights  and  obligations  of 
workers,  including  platform  workers,  depending  on  their  legal  status,  to  avoid  labour 
market  fragmentation.  This  should  take  into  account  the  specificities  of  each  country, 
avoiding creating barriers for new forms of work to flourish while ensuring the appropriate 
access  to  social  protection  coverage.  Taking  into  account  the  impact  of  the  Covid-19 
pandemic  in  public  health,  it  is  also  important  that  platform  workers  have  appropriate 
access to health provisions, according to their classification eg. as an employee or self-
employed. Those provisions are determined at national level according to their labour 
law and social protection systems. Where problems occur is often where labour markets 
are not well-functioning and people may turn to such types of work due to the absence 
of others. Therefore, the aim should be to create better functioning labour markets (e.g. 
through the European Semester process), and to avoid making it more difficult to be self-
employed. 
 
There is not a typical ‘platform worker’ and they are not a clearly defined group. Some 
people offer their services through platforms to top up their income from another job. As 
stated by Eurofound, this means that they are often represented through other means 
by way of their main employment.  For others, it is their primary source of income. This 
also varies across countries and cities, including for the same platform. This shows that 
there  are  many  different  ways  in  which  people  choose  to  do  platform  work  and many 
different reasons for choosing this form of work. In these circumstances, one-size-fits-all 
proposals for “platform workers” are flawed. 
 
Those working on platforms are also generally free to work on numerous ones, e.g. they 
do  not  have  any  exclusivity  with  one.  Measures  to  reduce  this  flexibility  would  be 
detrimental to the consumers, the professionals and the platforms. Whilst there are some 
commonalities  between  platforms,  their  business  models  differ  greatly.  These 
differences make it impossible to generalise the nature of work, the employment status 
and the applicable social protection scheme. For all these reasons, regulating ‘platform 
work’  as  such  does  not  make  sense,  given  the  diversity  of  such  work,  the  different 
business models and the individuals working through platforms.  
 
 



 
Collective representation and links with competition policy: 
 
It  is  solely  up  to  Member  States  and  social  partners  at  national  level,  respecting  the 
different  industrial  relations  systems,  to  decide  if  and  how  to  tackle  the  issue  of 
representation  of  workers  engaging  in  new forms  of  work,  and  whether and  how they 
need to adapt to carry on fulfilling their mission to represent collectively employers and 
workers’ interests. It would harm national industrial relations systems and would breach 
the principle of subsidiarity to seek a harmonised approach on this at EU level. Indeed, 
it is doubtful whether the EU has the legal competence to legislate on matters relating to 
collective representation at all. 
 
It  is  also  necessary  to  reflect  the  large  diversity  of  situations  across  Member  States, 
including:  

systems,  in  which  self-employed  cannot  be  member  of  a  trade  union  or  be 
covered by collective agreements; 

self-employed joining/being represented in existing trade unions; 

creation of new trade unions to represent certain categories of workers (including 
platform workers), which in some cases negotiate working conditions de facto; 

creation of independent unions of platform workers extending certain (employee) 
labour  rights  and  protections  and  collective  bargaining  possibilities  to  specific 
occupations or to specific categories of workers (e.g. dependent self-employed); 

creation  of  associations  of  self-employed,  which  depending  on  the  national 
legislation  may  have  the  right  to  negotiate  a  collective  agreement  without 
infringing anti-trust regulation; 

exemptions  at  national  level  to  competition  rules  prohibiting  cartels  for  certain 
forms  of  self-employed,  sectors  or  occupations,  thereby  giving  them  a  right  to 
negotiate; 

co-operatives,  other  informal  structures  or  private  companies  organising  and 
providing services to self-employed, e.g. help with invoicing, access to training, 
or pooling resources to offer sick, maternity and holiday pay, but not giving the 
legal possibility to bargain collectively or sign agreements; 

platforms  developing  their  own  solutions,  e.g.  codes  of  conduct  and 
complementary social benefits.  
Self-employed,  including  those  offering  their  services  working  on  platforms,  carry  out 
their services for and with commercial contractors and are considered as undertakings. 
Therefore, they are subject to the rule of prohibition of price cartels between economic 
actors.  It  is  therefore  logical  that  agreements  made  between  self-employed  persons 
generally  go  against  the  rules  of  EU  competition  policy,  as  they  are  considered  as 
restricting or distorting competition within the internal market, when, for example, they 
directly fix prices, including wages or fees. 
 
Additionally it has to be acknowledged that the possibility for exemptions to be made for 
agreements or bargaining practices that promote economic progress and in relation to 
public interest, has been interpreted in case law of the European Court of Justice (ECJ) 
as exempting collective agreements for employees from the scope of competition law. 
The ECJ underlined correctly the role and autonomy of social partners in a number of 
Member States to set (e.g.) wages as part of collective bargaining. 
 
 
10 


 
Even though, whilst article 101 of the TFEU does not explicitly include an exemption from 
competition rules for agreements on pay and working conditions, this is the case in some 
national law. This is of course a decision for the national level and it also shows that the 
existing  rules,  interpreted  by  the  courts,  already  provide  the  necessary  elements  of 
flexibility. Therefore, there is no need to change existing EU competition rules to allow 
self-employed  persons,  including  those  working  on  platforms,  to  engage  in  collective 
bargaining or agreements concerning wages.  
 
For  justified  and  valid  social  reasons,  collective  agreements  establish  a  type  of  price 
cartel for employees, by setting wages. However, this is a completely different situation 
to self-employed, who are undertakings/economic operators, for which the same social 
reasons cannot/do not apply.  
 
Any attempt to undermine or subjugate competition law in order to address alleged bogus 
or  false  self-employment  is  not  appropriate. If  workers  are  found to  be  bogus  or  false 
self-employed, according to national legislation, they should be treated in the same way 
as  employees,  including  all  rights  and  obligations  of  an  employee,  as  this  is  a 
misapplication of the legal status of self-employed and does not require any further EU 
legislation. 
 
If some workers are categorized as self-employed, but in actual fact the characteristics 
of their work qualifies them as employees according to the national legislation, then this 
should  be  clarified  by  discussing  the  distinction  between  being  self-employed  and  an 
employee  –  not  by  extending  employment  rights,  such  as  the  right  to  negotiate  a 
collective agreement, to self-employed persons. 
 
It  would  also  likely  stifle  the  creation  and  development  of  new,  innovative  business 
models, including platforms, on which predominantly self-employed persons operate. 
 
Given the differences between individuals working through platforms, e.g. in terms of the 
amount they use it, whether it is their main source of income or not, and the fact that they 
often work not through one but a number of different platforms, there would be inherent 
difficulties  in  copy-pasting  salaried  employment  collective  bargaining  arrangements  to 
such a diverse group and it would not allow for legitimate representation of their different 
interests. 
 
Where solutions are being developed outside social dialogue structures, such as in the 
form  of  self-regulation  initiatives  or  codes  of  conduct,  or  providing  possibilities  for 
collective representation to some categories of self-employed, as is the case in some 
countries or by some platforms, it is important that the role of recognized social partners 
is respected. 
 
In  all  cases,  only  the  recognised  social  partner  organisations  should  have  the 
mandate/right  to  negotiate  and  implement  collective  agreements  and  the  decision  on 
which are the recognised social partner organisation is for the national level, according 
to their industrial relations system. 
 
Competition policy should not act as a barrier to the freedom to form an association (e.g. 
an  informal  group  wishing  to  represent  themselves  towards  the  management  of  a 
 
11 


 
platform) and the ability to discuss working conditions, training etc. However, discussions 
on elements such as prices, fees, including wages, if done by a group of self-employed, 
would breach rules on cartels. This is only possible for employees within the context of 
train union membership – covered under collective bargaining. It is also important that 
this does not undermine the business model of certain platforms whereby individuals are 
working via a number of different platforms, allowing representatives of specific groups 
of gig workers to represent the interests of competing platforms.  
 
CONCLUSION 
 
BusinessEurope  stands  ready  to  contribute  with  further  analysis  as  this  process 
progresses in order to support relevant legislators. We believe that consideration of the 
various types of platforms that exist and content they display should be central to any 
reform. At the same time, further legal clarity will be needed on what is actually deemed 
illegal under the DSA and what issues will be left to be covered in other legislation. As a 
result,  clearer  upgraded  responsibilities  in  relation  to  notice  and  takedown  can  be 
understood. This would be a first beneficial step in this area to ensure Europe has a safe 
and fair online market for consumers and businesses customers to continue benefitting 
from. 
 
In  relation  to  gatekeeper  platforms  that  have  potential  market  effects,  the  idea  for  a 
specific ex-ante control mechanism to be used in relation to global gatekeeper platforms 
should  be  carefully  considered. In  addition, policy-makers  should  carefully  assess the 
interaction with existing regulation, such as the P2B Regulation and the possible effects 
between  ex-ante  regulation  and  ex-post  competition  law  enforcement  on  each  other. 
Such a mechanism must not contradict existing competition law rules, in particular Art. 
102 TFEU, nor set lower intervention standards that would circumvent competition rules. 
Due process will be key to ensure arbitrary actions are not taken. 
 
In relation to platform workers, we agree that the Commission should continue to map 
the situation and policy responses across Member States and develop a repository of 
practices, as this would be useful to better understand the commonalities and differences 
of  national  approaches  to  this  issue.  As  a  follow-up  to  the  information  gathering  and 
analysis, the EU should facilitate a better understanding and learning between Member 
States and social partners on how to deal with the challenges faced and the solutions 
found, by organising tripartite discussions on this topic.  
 
Discussions and learning could focus on: 
 

Challenges faced and solutions developed regarding collective representation of 
employees and self-employed in the collaborative economy. This should cover 
diverse  national  approaches,  including  binary  systems  where  solely  employee 
and  self-employed  categories  of  workers  exist  and  other  systems  where  more 
than 2 categories exist.  

How  member  states  assess  the  different  characteristics  of  workers  when 
setting/adapting definitions of employees and self-employed, including in view of 
new  forms  of  work,  and  thereby  determining  which  labour  law  and  social 
protection  requirements  apply.  This  should  include  learning  on  any  specific 
criteria used by Member States and the influence of ECJ rulings.   
  
 
12 


 
Where Member States and social partners ask for it, the EU should support development 
of  innovative  initiatives,  for  example  on  worker  representation,  collective  bargaining, 
access  to  social  protection  and  measures  to  improve  working  conditions,  in  line  with 
national  industrial  relations  systems  and  practices.  This  can  include  initiatives  led  by 
industry,  specific  sectors,  social  partners  and  individual  platforms.  This  can  be  done 
through  compilations  of  practices  and  exchanges  between  Member  States  and  social 
partners. There should be a clear acknowledgment that what works in one context may 
provide inspiration to others, but it is not necessarily replicable.  
 
Before  the  Commission  develops  any  opinion  or  approach  on  the  issue  of  collective 
bargaining, self-employed and competition law in relation to platform workers, it should 
provide an overview/clarification of the different existing options for exemption from EU 
competition rules, e.g. in relation to public interest and economic progress, and how such 
exemptions  cover  bargaining  and  agreements  on  social  topics,  including  through 
interpretation  by  the  ECJ  and  national  competition  rules.  The  Commission's  recent 
announcement to look at competition law and self-employed platform workers should be 
supported  by  an  impact assessment  as  part  of  any  public  consultation.  This  could  be 
followed up by a discussion with Member States and social partners.  
 
13