Detta är en HTML-version av en bilaga till begäran om allmän handling 'Digital Services Act / Digital Markets Act'.


October 2021
Regulation of online advertising
Position paper
Key messages
Schibsted is a family of digital consumer brands based in the Nordics with world-class
Scandinavian media houses, leading classifieds marketplaces and tech start-ups in the field
of personal finance and col aborative economies. Many of Schibsted´s digital services are
financed by online advertising. It is an important source of revenue for our newspapers, but
also ensures access to digital consumer services such as price comparison sites, that make
people’s daily lives easier. Moreover, it supports the operation of classified marketplaces that
al ow people to sel  used goods to each other, contributing to a circular economy.
Schibsted ful y understands the concerns of decision-makers about intrusive online
advertising and the use of users’ data. However, a complete prohibition of targeted
advertising or strict opt-in requirements would pose fundamental chal enges to the continued
availability of high quality journalistic content for the public and lead to fewer and poorer
services for users. Online advertising directly funds high quality journalism, the
creation of new content and services, and makes services available with lower or no
financial payment from users. A reduction in online advertising revenue is likely to
lead to fewer services for users, decreased quality, and increase the imbalance in
access to authoritative and reliable news media for those who cannot or will not pay
for access to such content.

We believe that the concerns related to the use of personal data in online advertising can be
solved by the fol owing means:
1. Effective enforcement of GDPR and e-privacy rules to ensure personal data is
not used in a way that is harmful to consumers or the interest of society at
large.

2. Limit the extensive data collection across the Internet by digital gatekeepers by
strengthening Article 5a in the DMA.
3. Add transparency requirements for and opt-out from online advertising in the
DSA that would benefit consumers, publishers and advertisers alike.
There are already several aspects of EU law that protect users’ personal data, which is
broadly defined and includes pseudonymous data, the type of data mostly used in online
advertising. The use of personal data for online advertising is regulated by GDPR, according
to which there are two potential y relevant legal bases (consent, art. 6(1a) and legitimate
interest
, art. 6(1f)), and the use of device identifiers is regulated by the e-privacy Directive
(forthcoming e-privacy Regulation).
Adding new rules for the use of personal data for advertising in the DSA would risk
double or even triple regulatory scrutiny over the same issue. It would also lead to
multiple national authorities enforcing rules around online advertising.

1


DMA  Article 5a - Collection and combination of personal data by digital gatekeepers
Digital gatekeepers, usual y the “point of first contact” online, often require users to agree
and consent to the use of their data across other parts of their business and the wider
internet, including from sites and apps where users cannot reasonably be expected to
understand that their data is being col ected by the gatekeeper. This “aggregation of
consent” leads to an accumulation of data in the hands of the few largest companies, raising
barriers to competition, and to users feeling “fol owed” online and not understanding how
their data is being col ected and used online.
Gatekeepers col ect data from third party services in different ways, for example when
consumers sign into an app or website using the gatekeepers’ sign in functionality. A
gatekeeper can also be a data processor as defined in GDPR. In this scenario the
gatekeeper may process data from external sources, but only as a service provider
processing data in accordance with instructions from their customers (the data control er)
and limited to the purposes defined by their customers.
The prohibition on gatekeepers combining personal data from third party services with their
own services in Article 5a of the DMA would ensure gatekeepers cannot col ect personal
data about users across the Internet. We are of the strong view that the feeling of being
surveil ed on the Internet, especial y for advertising purposes, would be wel addressed by
the proposed prohibition. However, for Article 5a to be efficient and really make a
difference, the consent exception must be removed.

Consent is often a precondition to al ow users to access and use gatekeepers’ services and
most gatekeepers already use consent to justify broad data col ection and nudge users
towards accepting their terms and conditions.
We therefore cal for the fol owing amendment to Article 5a to clarify and strengthen the
provision.
Article 5a - Current text
Article 5a – Proposed text
[In respect of each of its core platform services
[In respect of each of its core platform services
identified pursuant to Article 3(7), a gatekeeper
identified pursuant to Article 3(7), a gatekeeper
shal :]
shal :]
(a) refrain from combining personal data
(a) refrain from combining personal data
sourced from these core platform services with
sourced from these core platform services with
personal data from any other services offered by personal data from any other services offered by
the gatekeeper or with personal data from
the gatekeeper or with personal data from
third-party services, and from signing in end
third-party services, and from signing in end
users to other services of the gatekeeper in
users to other services of the gatekeeper in
order to combine personal data, unless the end
order to combine personal data, unless the end
user has been presented with the specific
user has been presented with the specific
choice and provided consent in the sense of
choice and provided consent in the sense of
Regulation (EU)
Regulation (EU)
2016/679.
2016/679.
2


DSA – Article 24 - Transparency and user choice on all online platforms
Transparency is general y lacking in the online advertising ecosystem, to the detriment of
users, advertisers and publishers. While Article 24 in the Commission's proposal on the DSA
introduces certain elements of transparency, we suggest the fol owing additions:
1. More transparency around which entities are involved in the delivery of an online
advertisement. The first step in control ing personal data, both for consumers,
publishers and advertisers, is insight. Especial y for smal er publishers, a lack of
knowledge about vendors involved in their advertising business makes taking
meaningful decisions around business partnerships and data usage chal enging.
Additional transparency is important to enable col aboration with vendors that handle
personal data in compliance with GDPR, and to select trustworthy partners and
vendors.
2. Greater user choice in how personal data is used in online advertising. Although
targeted advertising is a key source of revenue for most online media services, users
should have the option of opting out should they wish.

The GDPR already applies to targeted advertising based on personal data, and to a great
extent the current weaknesses in user choice, is an enforcement issue of the GDPR. Under
GDPR, there are several potential legal bases for processing personal data. Consent (GDPR
art. 6(1a)) is one of these, but not the only one. The legislator therefore has acknowledged
under GDPR that consent should not always be the legal basis for processing personal data,
and that other legal bases may sometimes be more appropriate. Through the legal basis
legitimate interest (GDPR art. 6(1f)), different interests that may be present are
acknowledged. Additional y, the legitimate interest legal basis opens for a concrete
assessment of how personal data is actual y processed, and what measures to protect
users' integrity are in place. User choices are often relevant also under the legal basis of
legitimate interest, although normal y as an opt-out and not opt-in.
To strengthen user choice, we propose the fol owing amendment to Article 24 of the DSA:
Article 24.2 – Current text
Article 24.2 new – Proposed text
Online platforms shall offer users the
possibility

to
easily
opt-out
from
micro-targeted tracking and advertisements
that are based on their behaviour data or
other

profiling
techniques,
within
the
meaning of Article 4(4) of Regulation (EU)
2016/679.

Schibsted also supports further clear prohibitions to strengthen privacy and consumer
protection in the online advertising ecosystem . These are:
3


1. No use of sensitive data for targeting purposes. Sensitive data is defined as
special categories of data according to GDPR art. 9(1), meaning personal data
revealing racial or ethnic origin, political opinions, religious or philosophical beliefs,
trade union membership, genetic data, biometric data, data concerning health and
data concerning a natural person's sex life or sexual orientation.
2. No targeting of vulnerable groups such as children, or people showing interest for
specific health issues (such as il nesses or medicines), or specific sensitive content
such as ethnicity, religious beliefs or sexual orientation.
Contextual advertising
Many decision-makers favour “contextual advertising” over “targeted advertising” and believe
this would be a workable and beneficial solution to news publishers in Europe. While
contextual advertising is already in use and complements other forms of online advertising,
the commercial potential remains uncertain. At Schibsted, contextual advertising is in a
nascent stage and only a smal part of our overal online advertising revenues. Our estimates
show that even in the longer term, contextual advertising wil most likely not amount to more
than 15% of our advertising revenue in the future.
Contextual advertising is for several reasons not as effective for advertisers and not as
relevant to users. For contextual advertising to function effectively on a news publishers’
platform, the user would need to read a relevant, non-generic article in the same time period
an advertiser has a relevant message to communicate. This is not always the case. Viewing
a single article is also not a clear indication of a user's interests, limiting the ability of
contextual advertising to present users with advertising of relevant products and services
based on their interests.
Furthermore, contextual advertising in its current form is not clearly defined by legislators,
and its scope and value wil differ depending on the definition used. It can be an
advertisement based on the content of a newspaper article, but also based on certain
personal data such as geographical location of the user or keywords used. In both cases,
those set to benefit most from contextual advertising would be search engines and / or large
social networks that already cater to different groups based on these criteria; keywords
used in search queries or geographical locations of groups active on their platforms.
Final y, it is important to note that the delivery of contextual advertising also uses personal
data. Personal data is used in the technical delivery of the advertisement (e.g. the IP
address of the user is processed by a server to place the advertisement on a given site), and
for advertisement / campaign measurement (how many times an advertisement has been
shown to a user).
We are strongly of the view that permitting only contextual advertising would be to the
detriment of the media sector in Europe. Contextual advertising can continue to be a
useful form of advertising, but should not replace more targeted advertising that is
both more relevant to the user and has a higher value to both advertisers and
publishers alike.

4