This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Digital Services Act / Digital Markets Act'.


The Digital Services Act Out-of-Cou  Mechanism
Non-paper
A icle 18 of the proposed Digital Services Act (“DSA”)1 introduces an out-of-cou (“OOC”)
mechanism, whereby users of online pla orm services may contest in an OOC forum “content
moderation decisions”2 by providers of such services. Users may contest any content
moderation decision, whether made pursuant to a noti cation of il egal content, the service
provider’s terms and conditions, or removal orders from a competent authority. There is no
requirement for users to exhaust internal complaint-handling options o ered by the service
provider prior to having recourse to the OOC mechanism. Users (including sophisticated
business users) are required to bear no, or only li le, cost for use of the OOC mechanism, with
the service provider bearing the brunt of it.3 Any third-pa y body that ful l s a limited set of
criteria may be ce i ed as an OOC dispute se lement body which users may unilateral y
engage to examine a dispute. Decisions of such ce i ed bodies are binding on service
providers, with the la er not having the option to appeal them before regular cou s.
We appreciate the oppo unity to contribute constructively to discussions surrounding
the DSA. It is in that spirit that we are sharing this non-paper. Whereas we suppo the
overall DSA objective to provide users with e ective redress options against content
moderation decisions made by service providers, we are concerned about several
potential unintended consequences that the OOC mechanism proposed in the DSA may
have in its current form. Below we explain these concerns related to (a) legal unce ainty
brought by overlapping OOC mechanisms introduced in other EU legislation, (b) the risk
of fragmentation across the EU, (c) enabling bad actors, and (d) paralysing content
moderation. We also suggest alternatives that would help alleviate these concerns,
including amended language for A icle 18 of the DSA.

1 European Commission Proposal for a Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on a
Single Market For Digital Services and amending Directive 2000/31/EC, COM(2020) 825 nal, 15
December 2020.
2 These are decisions to: (a) remove or disable access to users’ information; (b) suspend or terminate the
provision of the service, in whole or in pa , to users; or (c) suspend or terminate users’ accounts.
3 A icle 18 provides that the service provider shal reimburse the user for any fees and expenses in the
event that the OOC dispute se lement body decides in favor of the user; whereas, in the event that the
OOC dispute se lement body decides in favor of the service provider, the user shal have no obligation
to reimburse any fees or expenses paid by the service provider.
1

Potential unintended consequences
a)
Causing legal unce ainty
There is signi cant overlap between the OOC mechanism introduced by the DSA and existing
OOC mechanisms introduced by other EU laws. For example:

The Audiovisual Media Services Directive (“AVMSD”)4 already provides for an OOC
mechanism to se le disputes between users and video-sharing pla orms relating to
measures video-sharing pla orms adopt to protect: (a) minors from content that may
impair their physical, mental or moral development; and (b) the general public from
content inciting to violence or hatred, provoking to commit a terrorist o ence,
constituting child pornography, or promoting racism and xenophobia5.

The EU Copyright Directive (“EUCD”)6 already provides for an OOC mechanism for
users to have recourse to, for cases where rights holders request online
content-sharing service providers to remove access to speci c works or other
subject-ma er7.

The Pla orm-to-Business Regulation (“P2B Regulation”)8 already provides for an OOC
mechanism to se le disputes between business users and providers of online
intermediation services in relation to decisions by the service providers to restrict,
suspend or terminate the provision of the online intermediation services concerned9.
This overlap leads to legal unce ainty for service providers and confusion for users as to
which OOC mechanism they may have recourse to for se ling disputes arising in
relation to content moderation decisions
.
b)
Risking fragmentation
Under the DSA, any third pa y that ful l s a limited set of criteria may apply to the Digital
Services Coordinator of the Member State where it is established in order to be ce i ed as an
OOC dispute se lement body. Users from across the EU can have recourse to any such
ce i ed body in order to contest any content moderation decision by service providers, made
both on the basis of the law and/or the providers’ terms and conditions.
4 Directive 2010/13/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 10 March 2010 on the
coordination of ce ain provisions laid down by law, regulation or administrative action in Member States
concerning the provision of audiovisual media services and amending Directive 2018/1808 of the
European Parliament and of the Council of 14 November 2018.
5 A icle 28(b)(7) AVMSD.
6 Directive (EU) 2019/790 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 April 2019 on copyright and
related rights in the Digital Single Market and amending Directives 96/9/EC and 2001/29/EC.
7 A icle 17(9) EUCD.
8 Regulation (EU) 2019/1150 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 20 June 2019 on promoting
fairness and transparency for business users of online intermediation services.
9 A icle 12 P2B Regulation.
2

This system is highly likely to result in contradicting decisions by di erent ce i ed bodies in
di erent Member States as regards the same legal provision or online pla orm policy.
For example, under the OOC mechanism that the DSA envisages, a user whose content has
been removed or disabled in Austria because it is defamatory under Austrian law may have
recourse to a ce i ed body in Italy, where the content may stil be available, to review that
action. The body seized by the dispute may reach a decision that contradicts judicial
precedent for defamation in Austria10. Given the DSA provides that decisions reached through
use of the OOC mechanism are binding on online pla orms, the question arises what e ect
the use of the OOC mechanism for interpretations of the law may have on the coherence
of the national corpus juris
.
Similar coherence issues may arise where the same online pla orm policy is interpreted
di erently by di erent ce i ed bodies across the EU. A ce i ed body in, say, Sweden may
have very di erent views from a ce i ed body in, say, Germany, as to how an online pla orm’s
policy on hate speech should be interpreted. Faced with a reality in which they need to make
sense of a patchwork of contradicting decisions on their policies by di erent OOC dispute
se lement bodies across the EU, content moderators may face decision-paralysis and
online pla orms may be incentivised to refrain from adopting and enforcing detailed
policies on ma ers where OOC decision-making fragmentation is high and there is an
increased risk of having similar circumstances treated di erently
.
Fragmentation may also result from users reve ing to multiple OOC dispute se lement bodies
to adjudicate the same issue, or from incentives OOC dispute se lement bodies may have to
decide in favor of users in order to a ract new cases.
Any OOC dispute se lement mechanism should be designed in a manner that avoids
fragmentation and ensures high-quality decisions.
c)
Enabling bad actors
Under A icle 18, users may have recourse to the OOC mechanism that the DSA provides for
the universe of decisions made by providers of online pla orm services to remove or disable
access to information. This broad scope and lack of any exceptions or safeguards risks
empowering bad actors and undermining fundamental rights of third pa ies
.
For example, a user could contest before an OOC dispute se lement body an online pla orm’s
decision to remove child sexual abuse material from its services, including where that decision
was taken to comply with a con dential Member State authority order under A icle 8 DSA.
10 In principle, defamatory content is removed, or access to it is disabled, at local level. This is because
defamation laws may di er signi cantly from country to country, with some countries not considering
defamation il egal. In this example, this would mean that the Italian OOC dispute se lement body could
order the online pla orm to reinstate the content in Austria.
3

Disclosure of this information through the OOC mechanism would undermine authorities’
investigatory e o s and disregard the rights of victims.
In addition, spammers or other bad actors may be able to piece together information about
online pla orms’ content moderation systems and processes, disclosed through use of the
OOC mechanism. This could al ow them to undermine or circumvent those systems and
processes in the future, pu ing user safety at risk.
d)
Paralysing content moderation
The very scale at which content moderation takes place should not be underestimated. The
breadth of content moderation decisions falling within the scope of the OOC mechanism
under the DSA may in practice paralyse 
content moderation e o s by online pla orms
to the detriment of user safety and innovation. 
For example:

What would the impact be on legitimate redress cases, if online pla orms needed to
dive internal resources to deal with and pay for frivolous complaints submi ed to the
OOC mechanism relating to the bil ions of pieces of spam and bad ads they moderate
each year? In recognition of this scale issue, national laws such as the German NetzDG
explicitly exclude the possibility for user redress (other than before regular cou s) for
ce ain content removal decisions (e.g. on spam grounds).

What would the impact be on the swi and e ective operation of content moderation
systems, if online pla orms received varying orders from many di erent OOC dispute
se lement bodies hearing disputes brought to them by di erent users on the same
type of content? Or if the same user brought the same ma er before di erent OOC
dispute se lement bodies across the EU, until one of them ruled in the user’s favor?

More general y, what would the impact be on innovation if, prior to launching a new
service feature or functionality, online pla orm service providers had to
counterbalance resources required for and costs associated with the operation of the
OOC mechanism?
The overly broad scope of the OOC mechanism also indicates that the Commission has
failed to suppo

both protecting users’ freedom of expression and service providers’
freedom to conduct a business. The requirement for service providers to submit to a binding
OOC mechanism for al kinds of content moderation decisions, and to incur costs
notwithstanding how unmeritorious the complaint or the outcome of the process, is
dispropo ionate. In its current form, the OOC mechanism could in fact threaten the ability of
some service providers to operate innovative, open and inclusive online pla orms.
4

A be er way forward
There are more appropriate means that both achieve the DSA policy objective of
providing users with e ective redress options, and avoid the unintended consequences
that the OOC mechanism may have. 
In fact, such means are already provided for in the DSA
proposal. In pa icular:

A icle 17 of the DSA requires online pla orm service providers to introduce
internal complaint-handling systems, whereby users may contest content
moderation decisions they make. Service providers will need to heavily invest in
building or expanding such systems (where they already exist) to allow for easy,
e ective and timely dispute resolution of user complaints in line with regulatory
requirements. 
In addition:

Service providers wil need to be transparent about the use of these internal
complaint-handling systems, being required under A icle 13(1)(d) of the DSA to
annual y repo on: (a) the number of complaints received; (b) the basis for
those complaints; (c) decisions taken to resolve the complaints; (d) the average
time needed to take such decisions; and (e) the number of instances where the
initial content moderation decisions were reversed as a result of user
complaints.

A icles 38 and 40 of the DSA provide that the Digital Services Coordinator of
the Member State where the online pla orm service provider is established shal
be responsible for the application and enforcement of the various obligations
arising from the DSA. In other words, the obligations to provide an internal
complaint-handling system and be transparent about its operation wil be
subject to regulatory oversight by Digital Services Coordinators.

A icle 68 of the DSA grants users the right to mandate representative bodies,
organisations or associations meeting a minimum set of requirements to
exercise on their behalf the right to make use of the internal complaint-handling
system under A icle 17 of the DSA.

A icle 43 of the DSA enables users to directly complain to the Digital Service
Coordinator of the Member State where they reside, if they consider that an online
pla orm service provider has infringed any of its obligations under the DSA - including
the obligations to provide an internal complaint-handling system and be transparent
about its operation.

Final y, if users do not agree with the decision reached through use of the internal
complaint-handling system or the Digital Services Coordinator complaint process, they
5

may always avail themselves of the possibility to have judicial recourse against the
content moderation decision of the online pla orm service provider.
These possibilities, individually as well as in aggregate, empower users to contest
content moderation decisions made by online pla orm service providers in ways that
were not possible before. 
It is not clear what additional bene t the introduction of an OOC
mechanism would bring about.
In any event, even if policymakers deemed that an OOC mechanism should be provided for
under the DSA for whatever reason, we consider that a more e ective approach to A icle 18
DSA is required. In pa icular:

The scope of online pla orm decisions to which the DSA’s OOC mechanism
applies should be narrowed down to termination of consumer accounts or service
provision to consumers, and exclude decisions made on spam grounds.


This would be a more propo ionate outcome: it would achieve the objective of
protecting freedom of expression through e ective user redress, without
unduly restricting the freedom to conduct a business. As noted above, the DSA
already requires, under A icle 17, the introduction of a robust internal
complaint-handling system for users to contest content moderation decisions
by service providers, under regulatory oversight. The OOC mechanism should
be reserved as an additional, second-line redress option to contest a more
limited set of decisions by service providers that may have a pa icularly
signi cant impact on users’ fundamental freedoms.


Clarifying that use of the OOC mechanism should be reserved to termination of
consumer accounts or service provision to consumers would also help with
legal ce ainty. Business users may already contest such termination decisions
under the P2B Regulation.

Final y, narrowing down the scope in such a way and excluding decisions made
on spam grounds, would avoid paralysing the scale of content moderation
e o s by online pla orms and help ensure that bad actors do not game content
moderation systems in place.

In order to avoid the risk of fragmentation, providers of online pla orm services
should identify in their terms and conditions speci c OOC dispute se lement
bodies that have been ce i ed by Digital Services Coordinators on the basis of
clear and appropriate criteria, and with which the service providers are willing to
engage to resolve disputes with users
. This would ensure that the OOC dispute
se lement bodies gain experience on the respective online pla orms’ content
6

moderation systems, ensuring a ce ain level of consistency, quality and continuance in
their decision-making.

Decisions reached through use of the OOC mechanism should not be legally
binding and judicial recourse against them should always remain possible
, for both
service providers and users concerned. This would help ensure the quality of OOC
decisions and legal ce ainty at large11.

In order to impede bad actors, deter frivolous complaints, and ensure scalability as wel
as high standards for decision-making, e ective safeguards should be introduced. In
pa icular:
(a) whereas service providers should engage in good faith in any a empt to resolve a
dispute through the OOC mechanism, pa icipation in the mechanism should
remain voluntary in nature;

(b) users should be required to exhaust internal appeals mechanisms o ered by
service providers 
in accordance with A icle 17 of the DSA, and provide evidence that
they have done so, prior to requesting that disputes be submi ed to the OOC
mechanism;
(c) there should be a clear time-limit within which users may request that disputes
be submi ed to the OOC mechanism
;
(d) users should only be allowed to submit a request for recourse to out-of-cou
dispute se lement once for the same issue;

(e) service providers and users should bear a reasonable propo ion of the total cost
of using the OOC mechanism
;
(f) both users and service providers should be able to appeal decisions issued by
OOC dispute se lement bodies before regular cou s
;
(g) service providers should have the possibility to suspend the provision of their
service to users that submit manifestly unfounded complaints to the OOC
mechanism
.
Such an approach would be consistent with the OOC dispute se lement model endorsed by
the European Parliament and the Council in other EU legislative instruments, most recently in
the context of the P2B Regulation. It would also help improve concerns related to costs,
11 At a minimum, to the extent that decisions reached through use of the OOC mechanism are binding, it
should be clari ed that, where online pla orms reinstate content pursuant to a decision by an OOC
dispute se lement body, they wil be immune from liability, if a cou later nds the content was il egal or
against the online pla orm’s terms and conditions.
7

e ciency, and due process of law. We provide a proposed amendment to A icle 18 DSA along
these lines as an Annex to this non-paper.
8

ANNEX:
Proposed text for A icle 18 DSA
1. Providers of online pla orm services shal identify in their terms and conditions two or more
out-of-cou dispute se lement bodies that have been ce i ed in accordance with paragraph
2 and with which they are wil ing to engage to a empt to reach an agreement with recipients
of the service on the se lement, out-of-cou , of any disputes between the provider and the
recipient of the service arising in relation to decisions to terminate the provision of the service
to that recipient or terminate that recipient’s account, with the exception of such decisions
made on spam grounds, provided that the recipients of the service a ected by those
decisions:
(a) are not traders within the meaning of A icle 2(e) of this Regulation;
(b) prior to having recourse to the out-of cou dispute se lement body, have exhausted the
appeal possibilities o ered to them by the internal complaint-handling system referred to in
A icle 17 and provided evidence that they have done so;
(c) submit a request for recourse to out-of-cou dispute se lement within two weeks from
the decision reached through the internal complaint-handling system.
Providers of online pla orm services may only identify out-of-cou dispute se lement bodies
providing their services from a location outside the Union where it is ensured that the
recipients of the service concerned are not e ectively deprived of the bene t of any legal
safeguards laid down in Union law or the law of the Member States as a consequence of the
out-of-cou  dispute se lement bodies providing those services from outside the Union.
2. The Digital Services Coordinator of the Member State where the out-of-cou dispute
se lement body is established shal , at the request of that body, ce ify the body, where the
body has demonstrated that it meets al  of the fol owing conditions:
(a) it is impa ial and independent;
(b) it has the necessary expe ise in relation to the issues arising in one or more pa icular
areas of il egal content, or in relation to the application and enforcement of terms and
conditions of one or more types of online pla orms, al owing it to contribute e ectively to the
a empt to se le the disputes;
(c) it o ers dispute se lement that is easily accessible through electronic communication
technology;
(d) it is capable of se ling disputes in a swi , e cient and cost-e ective manner and in at
least one o cial language of the Union;
(e) it has in place clear and fair rules of procedure, including strict con dentiality safeguards.
9

3. Notwithstanding the voluntary nature of this out-of-cou dispute se lement provision,
providers of online pla orm services and recipients of the service concerned shal engage in
good faith throughout any out-of-cou dispute se lement a empts conducted pursuant to,
and in accordance with, this A icle.
4. Providers of online pla orm services and recipients of the service concerned shal each bear
a reasonable propo ion of the total costs of out-of-cou dispute se lement in each individual
case. A reasonable propo ion of those total costs shal be determined, on the basis of a
suggestion by the out-of-cou dispute se lement body, by taking into account al relevant
elements of the case at hand, in pa icular the relative merits of the claims of the pa ies to the
dispute, the conduct of the pa ies, as wel as the size and nancial strength of the pa ies
relative to one another.
5. Any a empt to reach an out-of-cou
agreement on the se lement of a dispute in
accordance with this A icle shal not a ect the rights of the providers of online pla orm
services and of the recipients of the service concerned to initiate judicial proceedings at any
time before, during or a er the out-of-cou  dispute se lement process.
*   *   *
10