Detta är en HTML-version av en bilaga till begäran om allmän handling 'Digital Services Act / Digital Markets Act'.

DSA - Suggested amendments by SNAP Inc. 
 
 
 
TARGETED ARTICLES:  
 
1.  VLOP definition (art. 25.4 + new 25.4a) 
2.  Internal Complaint handling system (art. 17.1)  
3.  Independent audits (art. 28)  
4.  Data access and scrutiny (art. 31.1 - 31.3)  
 
 
 

•  Art. 25.4 (based on the Council’s Compromise Text on proposed DSC designation procedure) 
Council Compromise Text 
Proposed Amendment 
Article 25 - Paragraph 4 
Article 25 - Paragraph 4 
 
 
The Digital Services Coordinator of establishment shall adopt a decision 
4. The Digital Services Coordinator of establishment shall adopt a decision designating as a 
designating as a very large online platform for the purposes of this Regulation  very large online platform for the purposes of this Regulation the online platform under their 
the online platform under their jurisdiction which have a number of average 
jurisdiction which have a number of average monthly active recipients of the service equal 
monthly active recipients of the service equal to or higher than the number 
to  or  higher  than  the  number  referred  to  in  paragraph  1,  and  which  are  susceptible  to 
referred to in paragraph 1. 
systemic risks in the meaning of article 26 and based on the criteria set out in paragraph 
 
4a. 
[...] 
[...] 
 
Justification 
 
The Digital Services Coordinator of establishment is the best placed authority to assess whether a platform that meets the quantitative threshold qualifies as a very-large 
online platform and to designate them as such. The designation process increases legal certainty for companies who would clearly know whether they are subject to additional 
obligations. The decision of the DSC should take into account also qualitative criteria to allow for a case-by-case risk-based assessment. As proposed by the EC, the Digital 
Service Coordinator will continue to verify every 6 months whether the status of the platform has changed. 
 
 
 
 
Proposed Amendment 
 
Article 25 - paragraph 4a (new) 
3  a.  In  determining  whether  an  online  platform  is  susceptible  to  system  risk  in  the 
meaning  of  article  26,  the  Digital  Service  Coordinator  shall  take  into  account  the 
following criteria:
 
 
a) business model, namely: the nature of the platform and its role in facilitating public 
debate and viral dissemination of content;  
 

b) operating model, namely the platform’s ability to meet best-in-class standards in 
terms of safety-by-design, privacy-by-design, content curation, and pre-moderation in 
order to contain risks; 
 
c) the historical prevalence of illegal content on the service.  
 
Justification 
 
VLOPs should be designated not only on the basis of a quantitative threshold, but also by assessing whether they are likely to pose systemic risks. This will be evaluated 
based on qualitative criteria taking into account the platform’s business model, the way it operates its business to prevent risks, as well as the relative lack of harms occurring 
on the platform. If a company achieves high scores in these areas, there will be no need to impose the burdensome VLOP obligations which are conceived to address systemic 
risk. The DSA should incentivize socially responsible companies that are building safer platforms for consumers by reducing their potential liability. If a company poses low 
systemic risk, there will be no need to consider it as a VLOP. The qualitative criteria will essentially constitute safety valves to avoid wrongful designation. 

 
 
 
 
 

 
•  Article 17 - paragraph 1 
Commission 
Proposed Amendment 
Article 17 - paragraph 1 
 
 
 
1.Online platforms shall provide recipients of the service, for a period of at least six  1.Online platforms shall provide recipients of the service, for a period of at least three 
months following the decision referred to in this paragraph, the access to an effective  months following the decision referred to in this paragraph, the access to an effective 
internal  complaint-handling  system,  which  enables  the  complaints  to  be  lodged  internal complaint-handling system, which enables the complaints to be lodged 
electronically and free of charge, against the following decisions taken by the online  electronically and free of charge, against the following decisions taken by the online 
platform  on  the  ground  that  the  information  provided  by  the  recipients  is  illegal  platform on the ground that the information provided by the recipients is illegal 
content or incompatible with its terms and conditions:  
content or incompatible with its terms and conditions: 
 
(a)decisions to remove or disable access to the information; 
(a)decisions to remove or disable access to the information; 
(b)decisions to suspend or terminate the provision of the service, in whole or in 
(b)decisions to suspend or terminate the provision of the service, in whole or in 
part, to the recipients; 
part, to the recipients; 
(c)decisions to suspend or terminate the recipients’ account. 
(c)decisions to suspend or terminate the recipients’ account.  
[...] 
[...] 
Justification 
 
As stressed by the European Data Protection Supervisor, internal complaint handling mechanisms should not contradict the objective of data minimisation pursued by article 
5 of the GDPR (Regulation (EU) 2016/679). The obligation for online platforms to provide users with an effective internal complaint-handling system means that platforms 
would have to retain the relevant elements referred to in sub-paragraphs a, b and c, therefore including personal data during the requested period of 6 months (at least). This 
appears disproportionate and might lead to an unbearable administrative burden for players who have embraced and incorporated key GDPR principles, such as privacy-
by-design and data minimisation, in their product design and operation. A 3-month retention period would be more aligned with the GDPR principles.
 
 
 
 

•  Article 28 
 
Commission 
Proposed Amendment 
Article 28 
 
 
Very large online platforms shall be subjectat their own expense and at least once  Very large online platforms may be required to be subject to audits performed by the 
a year, to audits to assess compliance with the following
Digital Service Coordinator of establishment or the European Commission to assess 
(a)the obligations set out in Chapter III; 
compliance with the following: 
(b)any commitments undertaken pursuant to the codes of conduct referred to 
(a)the obligations set out in Chapter III; 
in Articles 35 and 36 and the crisis protocols referred to in Article 37. 
(b)any commitments undertaken pursuant to the codes of conduct referred to in 
[...] 
Articles 35 and 36 and the crisis protocols referred to in Article 37. 
[...] 
Justification 
 
A general requirement of independent annual audits to be conducted and paid for by VLOPs would be disproportionate. This obligation translates not only into significant 
costs and administrative burdens, but also requires deeply changing data retention and data governance practices, especially when such practices have been designed to 
incorporate privacy-by-design and safety-by-design principles. Moreover, the audit exercise would require disclosing very sensitive business information.
 
Audit should be required on an ad-hoc basis only where there is a suspicion or a risk that VLOPs are infringing their obligations or commitments. The DSC of establishment 
and

 
 the European Commission are the best placed entities to perform such independent audits with the purpose of assessing compliance with this Regulation. 
 
 
 

•  Article 31 
 
Commission 
Proposed Amendment 
Article 31 - paragraph 1 
 
 
 
1.Very  large  online  platforms  shall  provide  the  Digital  Services  Coordinator  of  1.Very large online platforms shall provide, the Digital Services Coordinator 
establishment  or  the  Commission,  upon  their  reasoned  request  and  within  a  of establishment or the Commission, upon their reasoned request and within 
reasonable  period,  specified  in  the  request,  access  to  data  that  are  necessary  to  a reasonable period, specified in the request, access to available data that are 
monitor  and  assess  compliance  with  this  Regulation.  That  Digital  Services  necessary to monitor and assess compliance with this Regulation. That Digital 
Co
  ordinator and the Commission shall only use that data for those purposes. 
Services Coordinator and the Commission shall only use that data for those 
purposes. 
Justification 
 
The right of the DSC and the EC to have access to data for the purpose of monitoring compliance with the regulation should be reconciled with the data minimisation 
and data protection obligations imposed by the GDPR. Many companies have already made important efforts to fully incorporate key GDPR principles into their 
platform architecture, operations and processes. Companies should be required to cooperate in good faith and provide all available information that might be 
relevant for the DSC and the EC.
 
 
 
Commission 
Proposed Amendment 
Article 31 - paragraph 2 
 
 
 
2.Upon a reasoned request from the Digital Services Coordinator of establishment or  2.Upon  a  reasoned  request  from  the  Digital  Services  Coordinator  of 
the Commission, very large online platforms shall, within a reasonable period, as  establishment or the Commission, very large online platforms shall, within a 
specified in the request, provide access to data to vetted researchers who meet the  reasonable period, as specified in the request, provide access to data, which 
requirements  in  paragraphs  4  of  this  Article,  for  the  sole  purpose  of  conducting  can  be  made  public,  to  vetted  researchers  who  meet  the  requirements  in 
research that contributes to the identification and understanding of systemic risks as  paragraphs 4 of this Article, for the sole purpose of conducting research that 
se
  t out in Article 26(1). 
contributes to the identification and understanding of systemic risks as set out 
in Article 26(1). 
Justification 
 

The text proposed by the EC does not qualify the type of data that shall be disclosed to independent researchers. Granting unlimited data access to third parties 
poses a broad range of risks. Companies could be required to disclose sensitive information entailing business secrets, personal data, and IP rights, as well as 
sensitive commercial data and information which lay at the core of their business models and from which their survival depends. 
 
We recommend clarifying in the text that vetted researchers should be able to have access to data that can be made public and thus disclosed without endangering 
com

 
panies’ business model and operations. 
 
Commission 
Proposed Amendment 
Article 31 - paragraph 3 
 
 
3.Very large online platforms shall provide access to data pursuant to paragraphs 1  3.Very  large  online  platforms  shall  provide  access  to  data  pursuant  to 
and  2  through  online  databases  or  application  programming  interfaces,  as  paragraphs 1 and 2. 
appropriate
Justification 
 
VLOPs should cooperate with the DSCs and the European Commission to ensure they have access to the relevant information held by companies. The practicalities 
of how access will be granted and how information will be exchanged should be left with the companies, which will decide this on a case-by-case basis with the 
DSC. 
 
 
We thus recommend adopting a principle-based approach for this article and leaving the operational details to the case-by-case assessment.