Detta är en HTML-version av en bilaga till begäran om allmän handling 'Digital Services Act / Digital Markets Act'.

  OUR MEMBERS 
 
 
Airbnb 
Etsy 
Microsoft 
TikTok 
 
Allegro 
Expedia Group 
Mozilla 
Twitter 
Amazon EU 
Facebook 
Nextdoor 
Yahoo 
 
Apple 
Google 
OLX 
Yelp 
Dropbox 
Hopin 
Snap Inc. 
 
eBay 
King 
Spotify 
 
 
Key aspects of the Digital Services Act proposal that need to be 
preserved in a final Council agreement. 
 
Brussels, 5th November 2021 
 
Mr Minister Anders Ygeman, 
cc. His Excellency Ambassador Lars Danielsson, 
cc. Deputy Ambassador Torbjörn Haak, 
 
DOT  Europe,  the  trade  association  representing  a  broad  range  of  leading  internet  companies  in 
Europe, would like to take the opportunity to write you with regards to the proposed Regulation on a 
Single Market for Digital Services (Digital Services Act, or ‘DSA’). 
 
As  the  proposal  is  considered  by  the  European  Parliament  and  the  European  Council,  we  want  to 
remain a constructive stakeholder and help support your work on this crucial piece of legislation. It is 
in that spirit would like to share with you the following comments for your consideration on matters 
which we believe to be crucial for the future of the European Single Market and the digital ecosystem 
as a whole.   
 
An opportunity to strengthen the EU Internal Market 
The  DSA  offers  the  opportunity  to  update  the  horizontal  rules  governing  the  online  ecosystem 
originally set-out in the e-Commerce Directive (eCD), adopted 20 year ago. Such an update requires a 
lot of care as the eCD managed to strike a delicate balance, enabling the digital sector to flourish over 
the EU. The European Commission’s proposal has the potential to preserve the important principles 
of  the  eCD  while  providing  a  more  robust  legislative  framework  to  provide  legal  certainty  and 
strengthening the Internal Market at the same time. It lays out a set of common rules and principles 
which will allow companies to operate more smoothly across Member States and better act against 
illegal content while enabling a better level of protection for users and consumers. 
The DSA was not drafted with the intention to solve all issues encountered online, but to put in place 
a  framework  were  more  nimble  and  detailed  pieces  of  legislation  could  fit.  Adding  into  the  DSA  a 
number of issues not foreseen by the European Commission’s draft could run counter the objectives 
of the text, contribute to the fragmentation of the Single Market and ultimately impact EU businesses. 
We therefore ask Member States to ensure that the text remains focused and principles-based with 
the  full  understanding  that  additional  vertical  legislation  might  be  needed  to  complement  this 
framework legislation on particular issues.  
 
Preserving the country of origin principle is of the utmost importance 
The Country-of-Origin principle (COO) is another crucial feature of the EU internal market. It allows 
companies to liaise with a single primary regulator in its Member State of establishment rather than 
1  
Rue du Trône, 60 
WWW.DOTEUROPE.EU 
 
1050 Brussels, Belgium 
 
 
Transparency Register: 53905947933-43 
Tel: +32 (0) 472 26 83 02 
DOT Europe was formerly known as EDiMA 


 
 
 
 
 
multiple ones across the EU. Such an approach guarantees that legislation is interpreted consistently 
in a cross border context, while lowering administrative burdens for businesses of all sizes. Companies 
can more easily offer their services across the EU and grow at scale. The COO principle is also crucial 
to foster the emergence of EU champions. It is therefore that the European Commission chose this 
approach as the most relevant one for the DSA.  
Some Member States call for more involvement of national regulators on all companies operating on 
their territory, we would like to point out that such measures will complicate the governance of the 
online ecosystem, and could potentially disincentivise businesses to operate across borders. The COO 
principle needs to remain a cornerstone of the DSA to ensure a strong internal market. 
 
Coherence between the DSA and other pieces of legislation will be key to the 
future of tech regulation 

As previously mentioned, the DSA is meant to update the rules around which our online ecosystem 
revolves. A lot of vertical, sectoral legislation was enforced in the past few years at EU and national 
level, and there is a lot more to come. At this stage, it is very important to ensure that the DSA does 
not contradict or create inconsistencies with other legislation already in place. The more new concepts 
are being introduced into the draft text, the bigger the risk is to inadvertently create legal uncertainty. 
The  consequences  of  legal  uncertainty  are  clear:  years  of  litigation  for  companies  and  a  de  facto 
impossibility to innovate and operate certain services until the cases are solved while slowing down 
the  fight  against  illegal  content  online.  We  ask  Member  States  to  ensure  that  the  DSA  remains 
coherent with other pieces of legislation by focusing on the core objectives of the draft text. 
 
We hope that you share the views that we have highlighted in this letter and request that you consider 
these as the discussions in Council continue and later-on in the negotiations with the co-legislators.  
 
Kind regards, 
 
 
 
 
 
2