Detta är en HTML-version av en bilaga till begäran om allmän handling 'Digital Services Act / Digital Markets Act'.





 
31 May 2021 
1(4) 
 
 
Nordic position on the DMA proposal 
 
The emergence of the platform economy has in many ways benefited the commerce 
sector, by allowing also smaller companies to reach customers globally. At the same 
time companies are becoming more and more dependent on a few global platforms 
which  provide  services  such  as  payment  processing,  advertising,  logistics,  cloud 
services, and not least online marketplaces. The unparalleled success of these new 
business models is not problematic by default, but it becomes an issue when the 
platforms use their size to impose unfair and restrictive practices, on their business 
users, i.e., our members.  
The Nordic commerce sector therefore welcomes the Commission’s proposal for a 
Digital  Markets  Act  (DMA)  and  strongly  support  the  aim  of  ensuring  a  fair  and 
contestable digital market. 
In  particular,  we  welcome  the  fact  that  the  proposal  is  a  regulation  (and  not  a 
directive) as it will become directly applicable in the member states and thus ensure 
a high level of harmonisation, targets specific practices shown by member state and 
EU authorities to be problematic, and allows for the designation of gatekeepers to 
be supported by qualitative elements when needed. 
To ensure that the final DMA is a truly workable and self-executing regulation, we 
urge the co-legislators to strengthen a few key areas of the proposal, which may 
benefit from additional attention. These key areas include: 
•  Terms,  definitions  and  obligations,  which  should  be  strengthened  and 
clarified, to prevent any misunderstanding or misuse by the relevant market 
players. 
•  Relevance  and  proportionally,  which  must  be  ensured,  both  when 
designating gatekeepers and when imposing obligations. 
•  Overlap with existing EU legislation, which must be avoided to ensure legal 
certainty for both gatekeepers, business users and end users. 
Furthermore, we are concerned that whilst the DMA is not defined as competition 
law,  it  is  blurring  the  lines  between  competition  law  and  internal  market 
regulation. As such, the DMA should remain a targeted solution for this specific 
situation considering the rapidly changing digital environment. 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
2(4) 
 
Designation as a gatekeeper 
The key to unlocking the obligations of the DMA, are the criteria for designating 
gatekeepers.  As  such,  the  criteria  must  be  objective,  easily  ascertainable  and 
considerate of the difference between the different core platform services (CPS). 
We  therefore  welcome  the  designation  process  in  Article  3  which  allows  for  the 
initial use of quantitative thresholds, to be supported by qualitative elements where 
needed. 
We  would  however  encourage  the  co-legislators  to  include  additional  relevant 
qualitative elements to the list,  such  as the  user’s ability to  multi-home  and the 
gatekeepers market share. 
Furthermore, we are concerned that the current quantitative thresholds in Article 
3(2)(b) does not sufficiently take into account the differences between CPSs, when 
it comes to determining whether a CPS does in fact serve as an important gateway 
for business users to reach end users. 
The presumption in Article 3(2)(b) is, that a CPS which is present in more than 3 
member states and which has in excess of 45 million monthly active end users and 
10.000 yearly active business users established or located within the EU, will fulfil 
the “important gateway” requirement for being designated a gatekeeper. 
To our knowledge, there is currently no industry standard of when a user is “active”, 
as the interaction required between a user and a CPS, for that user to be categorised 
as active, may, to our understanding, be different from CPS to CPS, or even from 
company to company. Due to the significance of this definition in complying with 
the DMA, this definition should not be left to the gatekeepers or the Commission 
(via  delegated  acts).  We  therefore  encourage  the  co-legislators  to  further  clarify 
what is meant by “active”, preferably with respect to each of the eight CPSs.  
By that same token, we also encourage the co-legislators to consider whether the 
current  presumption  of  45  million  monthly  active  end  users  and  10.000  yearly 
active business users, is proportionate when applied to all providers of all the CPSs 
or if the presumptions could benefit from being differentiated with respect to each 
of the CPSs.  
Obligations for Gatekeepers 
Article 5 and 6 contains 18 obligations which gatekeepers either must or most not 
apply. We welcome the inclusion of several of these obligations as we believe these 
will  benefit  our  members,  not  at  least  smaller  retailers  who  are  particularly 
dependent on the gatekeepers to reach their consumers. 
We are however generally concerned by the application of such lists, as they come 
with  certain  drawbacks,  including  the  risk  of  being  disproportionate  if  directly 
applicable  to  all  gatekeepers  and  CPS,  as  well  as  the  risk  of  quickly  becoming 
irrelevant and obsolete, or at least requiring very frequent updates. 
 

 
 
3(4) 
 
We therefore encourage the co-legislator to clarify the scope and application of the 
obligations,  and  to  ensure  that  these  are  applied  only  where  relevant  and 
proportionate.  
A possibility could be a combination of the two ideas proposed by BEREC in their 
11 March 2021 opinion on the DMA proposal and by the Commissions Economic 
Experts  in  the  JRC  rapport  on  the  DMA,  to  create  a  black  and  a  grey  list  of 
obligations.  
The black list would include obligations which are clearly anti-competitive and as 
such directly applicable to all gatekeepers across all CPSs, without adaptation. One 
such  obligation  could  be  the  current  obligation  in  Article  5(d)  requiring  that 
gatekeepers may not prevent or restrict business users from raising issues with any 
relevant public authority relating to any practice of gatekeepers. 
The grey list would include obligations which are presumed anticompetitive and 
thus  only  directly  applicable  to  gatekeeper(s)  providing  a  specific  CPS  and/or 
subject  to  a  pro-competitive  defence  with  the  burden  of  proof  being  on  the 
gatekeeper(s).  
Furthermore,  we  firmly  believe  that  delegated  acts  should  only  be  used  for 
technical  updates,  while  the  addition  of  new  business  practices  is  of  a  political 
nature  and  should  therefore  follow  the  normal  legislative  procedure.  We  are 
therefore unable to support the approach suggested in Article 10 of granting the 
Commission the mandate to update the lists through delegated acts.  
Comments on specific obligations: 
Article 5 
Point (b) – Most Favoured Nation Clauses 
We  welcome  that  the  proposal  contains  a  ban  on  so  called  broad  price  parity 
clauses.  This  means  that  Gatekeepers  will  not  be  able  to  stop  ecommerce 
companies  from  offering  the  same  goods  at  different  terms  and  prices  on  other 
platforms.  This  will  increase  competition  and  benefit  both  business  users  and 
consumers.   
Point (c) – Promotion of offers outside the core platform  
With  a  similar  rational  as  the  point  above  we  welcome  5c  as  this  will  enable 
business  users  to  conclude  contracts  with  consumers  outside  the  core  platform, 
even if the first point of contact between seller and buyer was on the platform.  
Point (d) – Complaint prohibition 
We strongly agree with this obligation which ensures that business users, without 
risk of retaliation, always have the possibility to complain to relevant authorities in 
case they feel that the platform is not fulfilling their part of the contract.      
 
 





 
 
4(4) 
 
Article 6 
Point (a) – Use of data in dual role situations 
We welcome this provision that deals with a situation where the platform acts both 
as a platform and as a seller. We welcome a ban on using data generated by the 
business to compete against that same user as this constitute an unfair advantage 
for the retail part of the platform. 
Point (d) – Self-preferential ranking 
We  believe  that  self-preferencing  should  be  possible  under  certain  conditions. 
However, it should always be made in a transparent manner.  
Furthermore, the current wording requires the gatekeeper to refrain from treating 
its own products/services more favourably and, at the same time, to apply fair and 
non-discretionary  conditions  to  it’s  ranking.  Presumably,  if  fair  and  non-
discretionary conditions are used, then it would not be possible for the gatekeeper 
to simultaneously treat its  own products/services more  favourably. As such,  the 
wording of the obligation could benefit from a clarification. 
Point (i) - Businesses can access their own data 
 
We welcome this provision that requires gatekeepers to allow their business 
customers to access the data about their sales, customers, and other commercial 
activity and that this access must be high-quality, continuous and realtime. 
 
   
 
 
Nicklas Lindström 
 
Ilari Kallio  
Policy advisor 
Chief Policy Adviser, EU Affairs 
xxxxxxx.xxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxxxx.xx 
and Corporate Law 
+46 73 693 8382 
xxxxx.xxxxxx@xxxxxx.xx  
+358401396912 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Lasse Hamilton Heidemann 
 
Jarle Hammerstad  
Head of EU- and International 
Head of Policy / Commerce 
Affairs 
x.xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxx.xx  
xxx@xxxxxxxxxxxx.xx  
+47 918 71 526 
+45 3374 6595