Detta är en HTML-version av en bilaga till begäran om allmän handling 'Digital Services Act / Digital Markets Act'.



 
 
 
POSITION PAPER 
 
21/05/21 
 
 
 
 
The Digital Markets Act (DMA) 
 
 
 
KEY MESSAGES 
 
 
1.  We agree with the intentions of the DMA to harmonise rules to ensure 
contestable and  fair markets  in  the  digital  space  where  gatekeepers 
are present.  

2.  No  contradiction  between  the  DMA  and  ex-ante  rules  enacted  by 
Member  States  should  exist,  it  should  remain  without  prejudice  to 
existing EU Competition Law. The DMA should apply and be enforced 
extraterritorially. 

3.  Appropriate  and  clear  criteria  are  needed  to  legally  define  what  a 
gatekeeper is to legally understand who is and who could potentially 
become  a  gatekeeper.  We  support  qualitative  and  quantitative 
designation in this regard. 

4.  We support the goals of obligations listed in Art 5 & 6. Notably those 
that ensure: fair access and use of data, an end to practices with lock-
in/entry barrier effects or self-preferencing/discriminatory access. We 
support achieving greater device neutrality, interoperability, effective 
data portability and more online advertising transparency. 

5.  We believe that Art 5 obligations should apply immediately without a 
Commission dialogue. Art 6 obligations that are susceptible of being 
further  specified should  have  the  option of  an  efficient  Commission 
dialogue.  

6.  We  support  the  use  of  Art  9  be  utilised  in  specific  circumstances 
where an overriding public interest exists. This should be based on a 
clear description of the overriding public interest. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
BUSINESSEUROPE a.i.s.b.l. 
 
AVENUE DE CORTENBERGH 168 – BE 1000 BRUSSELS – BELGIUM 
TEL +32 (0)2 237 65 11 – FAX +32 (0)2 231 14 45 – E-MAIL xxxx@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx.xx 
 
WWW.BUSINESSEUROPE.EU – Follow us on Twitter @BUSINESSEUROPE 
EU Transparency register 3978240953-79 
 


 
CONTEXT 
 
Tech companies have  rapidly grown  in the past decade. Some have been even more 
successful than others, what is now known as “big-tech”, has substantially increased its 
market capitalisation towards the end of 2019. This impressive growth has not only been 
due to success among consumers but also among business users, bringing both benefits 
as  a  result.  At  the  same  time,  they  have  raised  many  issues  related  to  fairness  and 
contestability  of  markets,  particularly  as  businesses  now  increasingly  depend  on  the 
variety of digital services that they offer.  
 
As  stated  in  the  DMA  explanatory  memorandum,  “Large  platforms  have  emerged 
benefitting  from  characteristics  of  the  sector  such  as  strong  network  effects,  often 
embedded  in  their  own  platform  ecosystems,  and  these  platforms  represent  key 
structuring  elements  of  today’s  digital  economy,  intermediating  the  majority  of 
transactions between end users and business users”.1
 Against this backdrop, the issue 
of platforms acting as gatekeepers, is an important one: it entails defining them precisely 
to  avoid  side-effects  which  would  penalise  other  businesses.  A  dedicated  framework 
could  ensure  a  fair  and  contestable  online  environment  to  reach  a  better  functioning 
Digital Single Market. 
 
The Platform Observatory explains that, the 50 top online platforms represent over 60% 
of website traffic across the EU. Towards the end of 2020, it was estimated that 59% of 
European companies derived more than 25% of their revenues from e-commerce. Nearly 
30% of all of Europe’s hotel bookings were performed via online platforms. In fact, 30% 
of global website traffic is dedicated solely to hospitality, social media and e-commerce 
platforms.  Overall,  around  61%  of  businesses  users  consider  their  success  highly  or 
completely dependent on online platforms. This trend continues to increase throughout 
the COVID-19 crisis and impact of local lockdown measures.  
 
The  consolidation  of  these  digital  services  is  increasing.  Around  40%  of  all  business 
acquisitions that took place between 2013 and 2020 involved online platforms.  
 
A limited number of platforms are considered to already be in this “gatekeeper” position; 
however, this does not automatically mean they are systematically abusing it. However, 
their size and systemic economic importance are so high and develop so rapidly that we 
need harmonised and future-proof measures to assess whether these markets remain 
fair, effective and contestable overtime. If constructed and applied properly, the DMA will 
benefit  consumers,  business  users,  providers  of  digital  services  and  the  wider  EU 
economy. 
 
We share the Commission’s ambition to ensure fair and contestable markets in 
the platform economy. As a key societal stakeholder, BusinessEurope outlines its 
reaction to the Commission proposal for the DMA, below: 
 
SCOPE  
 
We agree with the intentions of the proposal to set  up and  harmonise rules to ensure 
contestable and fair markets in the EU digital space where gatekeepers are present. If 
achieved,  this  should  result  in  more  choice,  greater  opportunities  for  competitors, 
consumers  and  business  users  alike,  as  well  as  productivity,  innovation,  competitive 
gains and competitive and fair prices.  
 
1 COM(2020) 842 final, p1 
 



 
 
While the DMA refers to harmonisation as an objective, it is also important that the DMA 
includes provisions to make this actionable in relation to preclusion of separate national 
rules regulating for the same substantial issues. It needs to be ensured that there is no 
contradiction between the DMA and ex-ante rules enacted by Member States in this area 
as  well  as  applying  without  prejudice  to  existing  EU  Competition  Law.  We  believe  Art 
1(6) could be strengthened in this regard. 
 
Due to the globalised nature of the digital economy, we also agree that the DMA should 
apply  and  therefore  be  enforced  extraterritorially  to  digital  platforms  based  outside  of 
Europe  but  offering  their  services  to  business  users  and  end  users  based  within  it. 
However,  it  is  important  for  the  stability  of  digital  markets  to  define  a  legally  certain 
Regulation that enables clear and predictable rules.  
 
It  is  also  important  to  note  that  the  EU  is  not  alone  in  looking  to  adapt  the  legislative 
framework  in  relation  to  digital  markets  to  ensure  fairness  and  contestability.  As  new 
digital  regulatory  models  are  developed  globally,  there  is  a  pressing  need  for  greater 
dialogue and collaboration amongst 3rd countries to support best practice-sharing and 
identify if any areas of divergence exist. 
 
DESIGNATING GATEKEEPERS 
 
Appropriate  and  clear  criteria  are  needed  to  legally  define  what  a  gatekeeper  is. 
Participants  and  stakeholders  of  digital  markets  need  to  understand  who  is  and  who 
could potentially become a gatekeeper. When defining these thresholds, we should avoid 
the inclusion of  smaller digital services that do not  pose gatekeeper  issues (eg. small 
and specific industrial platforms that have different market realities to the wider platform 
economy). 
 
We agree that gatekeeper  status can be determined  with the qualitative criteria in Art 
3(1) and the quantitative thresholds laid out on in Art 3(2). This should be used to instil 
with legal clarity who are gatekeepers in the market.  
 
We highlight that the definition of “Business user” (Art 2(17)) includes both natural and 
legal persons just as the definition of “End user(s)” (Art 2(16)). While we agree that both 
definitions  are  needed,  for  legal  clarity,  we  question  why  a  distinction  between  both 
definitions has not been made? What constitutes an “active user” could also aid legal 
certainty. 
 
Determining what a core platform service acting as an “important gateway for business 
users  to  reach  end  users”  under  Art  3(1)(b)  should  ensure  those  providing  a  merely 
technical service are not caught up in being designated a gatekeeper. The focus of the 
DMA  should  be  on  those  with  a  weight  of  importance  for  market  access  where 
businesses will meet end users and therefore act as a true digital gateway. The nature 
of a digital intermediary in bringing those two sides together should therefore be more 
clearly defined (eg. to conceptually ensure they are a gatekeeper). 
 
We support the need for Art 3(6) to designate a business with gatekeeper status in even 
when they are not fulfilling the clear quantitative  thresholds of Art 3(2), in accordance 
with Art 15. To ensure effective use of Art 3(6), we believe a link to the qualitative criteria 
laid  out  in  Art  3(1)  should  be  made.  In  support  of  designating  gatekeepers  using 
qualitative criteria, we remind the Commission that legal certainty remains a key principle 
of the DMA. These decisions should be adopted with caution and not be susceptible to 
political influence. Therefore, these decisions should be based on evidence. 
 



 
 
Art  3(6)  could  be  useful  in  relation  to  margin  cases  and  keep  the  DMA  effective  in 
practice.  Therefore,  it  could  apply  to  potential  gatekeepers  that  have  considerable 
economic power, are sufficiently large and dominant, have paramount significance and 
raise fairness and contestability concerns.  
 
In  support  of  legal  certainty,  guidelines  and  a  methodology  to  support  the  use  of  the 
power  to  designate  a  gatekeeper  without  fulfilling  quantitative  thresholds  of  Art  3(2) 
before the full application of the DMA applies would clarify its use (particularly in relation 
to concepts of “other structural market characteristics” which currently remain too vague). 
Suggestions recently made by a panel of economic experts on the DMA in relation to 
“objectively  measurable proxies”2  could  be  a  good  starting  reference  point  to  support 
these  guidelines  and  methodology,  particularly  in  relation  to  dependence  on  referral 
traffic  and  the  extent  of  multi-homing.  However,  the  publication  of  guidelines  or 
methodology in support of Art 3(6) should not delay the entry into force of the DMA. 
 
If the Regulator needs the ability for more flexible application of the thresholds in Art 3(2) 
as these business models typically progress rapidly, then the powers granted in Art 3(5), 
to  regularly  adjust  this  Regulation  to  market  realities  are  sufficient  and  could  also  be 
useful in relation to Art 5 & 6 obligations (see below). However, substantial  legislative 
changes should not be implemented via delegated acts, but rather by ordinary legislative 
procedure. 
  
We agree that gatekeeper status should be determined based on the nature of the overall 
undertaking. The Regulator should use Art 3(7) to determine which services offered by 
that undertaking can be viewed as “core services” pursuant to fulfilling specific criteria in 
Art  3(2)(b).  These  “core  services”  should  be  listed  by  the  Regulator.  Many  potential 
gatekeepers  have  gatekeeper  impacts  in  certain  services  markets  but  not  others.  We 
should only place obligations on the relevant core services that are important gateways 
for business users to reach end users. 
 
OBLIGATIONS 
 
We support the goals of obligations listed in Art 5 & 6. Notably the obligations that ensure: 
fair access and use of data, an end to practices with lock-in/entry barrier effects or self-
preferencing/discriminatory access. We also support achieving greater device neutrality, 
interoperability, effective  data portability and more online advertising transparency. To 
ensure proportionate outcomes and effective results, the impact of obligations on user 
privacy, business intellectual property, cybersecurity and integrity of technologies should 
be considered when determining what is expected from gatekeepers.  
 
However, some of these obligations take specific market situations and business models 
into account but will potentially be applied to a broad range of services and businesses. 
This could make obligations too rigid in their application and inevitably have unintended 
consequences.  
 
We believe the clearly blacklisted Art 5 obligations should apply immediately to ensure 
gatekeeper compliance without the need for a dialogue with the Commission. Further to 
this, we support the use of Art 7(2) to determine how Art 6 obligations that are susceptible 
of being further specified can be efficiently complied with by the gatekeeper.  
 
 
2 Pg 9, the EU Digital Markets Act, the Joint Research Centre (2021) 
 



 
Enabling the use of an efficient dialogue in relation to Art 6 should seek to ensure clear 
and  efficient  gatekeeper  compliance.  It  should  be  entered  to  in  good  faith  and  not  be 
used to try to negotiate lower obligations for the gatekeeper or result in evasion or an 
unjustified  delay  of  implementing  them  in  practice.  In  this  regard,  we  support  the 
Commission  having  the  final  decision  in  relation  to  the  dialogue  and  ability  to  launch 
further formal investigations.  
 
We also support this period of dialogue being time limited so that Art 6 obligations always 
apply,  regardless  of  the  outcome  of  the  dialogue,  following  6  months  of  gatekeeper 
designation, as supported by Art 3(8). At the same time, the gatekeeper should be able 
to  waive  the  need  for  dialogue  in  relation  to  certain  obligations  if  they  believe  their 
intended remedy of compliance is sufficient. 
     
While each Art 6 obligation should apply across the board, this efficient dialogue should 
increase  mutual  knowledge,  trust  and  ensure  better  compliance  as  the  technical 
implications that each obligation could have on those gatekeeper core services who will 
implement them could be demonstrable to the regulator. This procedure would also be 
an opportunity for the Regulator to consider the implications of solutions as to what each 
obligation  can  achieve  and  how  it  impacts  business  users  (particularly  SME’s)  and 
consumers. This will support clearer market conditions and therefore investment in the 
platform  economy  and  enable  these  obligations  to  be  applied to the  well documented 
diversity of Europe’s digital economy. In this regard, it would also be useful to take note 
of other interested parties in this efficient dialogue, particularly the business users that 
utilise  the  gatekeepers  core  services.  This  would  also  offer  gatekeepers  the  ability  to 
explain  how  other  legal frameworks  they  are subject  to  may  impact the application  of 
these obligations and overall diminish the prospect of further appeals in courts.  
 
While we support all Art 5 & 6 obligations we would like to highlight potential issues to 
which policy makers could add further legal clarity to. In relation to Art 5(b) it is unclear 
whether business users can offer different prices and conditions on their own website. 
This seems to be the spirit of the measure and that restricting business users to platforms 
only does not seem to be the goal, however, this should be more explicitly drafted in the 
final text, otherwise, we are simply swapping one lock-in measure for another. In relation 
to Art 6(1)(i), it is unclear as to whether this would mean that gatekeepers  must share 
data  with  one  another?  While  we  support  the  spirit  of  this  obligation  so  that  business 
users gain more access to data generated in the context of their operations, we would 
like to highlight the need to comply with the GDPR and general support for voluntary data 
sharing practices where fairness and contestability issues, in light DMA application, are 
not found to arise. 
 
We  believe  that  the  use  of  powers  in  Art  10  should  be  exercised  in  a  limited,  rapid, 
effective  and  punctual  manner  to  ensure  legal  certainty.  Just  as  Art  3  requires  clear 
criteria  in  terms  of  designating  gatekeepers,  businesses  need  clear  and  stable 
commitments to fulfil once defined as a gatekeeper. However, we understand the need 
for future-proof and flexible commitments. Overall, determination of the obligations and 
designation of gatekeepers should not remain totally fluid, otherwise crucial elements of 
this proposal will not be legally certain.  
 
SUSPENSION & EXEMPTION 
 
We  support  the  possibility  to  use  Art  9  in  specific  circumstances  where  an  overriding 
public interest exists. This should be based on a clear description of the overriding public 
interest laid out in Art9 and not be open to Member State or Regulator flexibility or abuse. 
We highlight that Art 9(2)(a) “public morality” could need further improvement by policy 
makers to ensure legal certainty.  
 



 
 
The procedure to request or apply should follow that mentioned in Art 32(4). It is clear, 
particularly  due  to  recent  events  such  as  COVID-19,  there  may  be  situations  where 
obligations of this Regulation could be suspended, at least until the public interest issue 
has  subsided,  for  services  to  be  delivered  if  they  are  helping  to  achieve  that  public 
interest goals as provided for in Art 9(2). 
 
Although  Art  8  is  subject  to  strict  conditions  and  only  permissible  upon  Commission 
agreement we are concerned that potentially permitting any gatekeeper or core service 
of a gatekeeper to suspend itself in whole or part from these obligations as they endanger 
their “economic viability” would send the wrong message to the digital single market. We 
would be stating that unfair practices can continue if the business model that bases itself 
on  such  practices  and  would  lose  its  economic  viability  otherwise.  However,  if  policy 
makers intend to go forward with this provision we would certainly request legal clarity 
as to how “economic viability” can be determined. 
 
INVESTIGATION & ENFORCEMENT 
 
We support the use of existing competition possibilities, such as information requests, 
interviews and interim measures limited in time in order for the Regulator to effectively 
enforce  this  Regulation.  But  it  should  be  clear  that  the  Regulator  has  a  reason  to 
investigate before it uses the powers listed in Chapter V and uses these powers on the 
principle  of  proportionality  which  while  included  in  the  Recitals,  should  be  used  in the 
main body of this Chapter.  
 
While  we  want  an  efficient  framework  we  also  believe  that  proportionate  procedures 
should  be  followed.  The  right  to  be  heard  within  Art  30  will  be  vital  in  ensuring 
proportionality. Therefore, the deadline of 14 days should be extendable, if requested by 
the gatekeeper, undertaking or association of undertakings, and the extension granted 
at the discretion of the regulator, on the basis of the complexity of obligations. 
 
It is also unclear whether these investigative powers apply only to gatekeepers or also 
3rd parties. We remain concerned with the impact of these investigations on the rest of 
the  supply  chain.  Particularly  when  enforcement  measures  could  then  be  used  for 
mistaken,  untimely,  or  incomplete  information.  Business  user  resources,  particularly 
among SMEs are low and should therefore be treated proportionally if they are involved 
in  an  investigative  procedure.  We  therefore  believe  Chapter  V  should  clarify  what 
responsibilities are expected from 3rd parties during these investigative procedures which 
currently  remain  unclear.  The  Commission  should  use  information  requests  to  non-
gatekeepers  with  caution,  particularly  due  to  the  limited  resources  these  businesses 
have.  Requests  for  access  to  databases  and  algorithms  should  be  limited  to  the 
gatekeepers themselves and not extend to 3rd parties. 
 
We  also  note  the  recent  European  Court  of  Auditors  report3  in  relation  to  the  lack  of 
resources  available  to  the  Commission  for  competition  enforcement  of  competition 
concerns, let alone adding this ex-ante Regulation on top. We should not underestimate 
the task at hand, particularly considering the timelines outlined throughout the proposal. 
Following entry into force, the Commission will be required to identify which undertakings 
that provide core platform services are within the scope of the Regulation and monitor 
compliance of 18 listed obligations. In the longer term, the Commission should have the 
resources  available  to  develop  a  detailed  understanding  of  the  markets  they  are 
 
3 Special Report No 24/2020: the Commission’s EU merger control and antitrust proceedings: a need to 
scale up market oversight (2020) 
 



 
regulating  and  the  business  models  that  are  at  play  in  those  markets.  We  therefore 
consider that more resources should be allocated to enforce the DMA. 
 
Furthermore, although we strongly support centralised supervision and enforcement of 
the DMA at EU level, national competition authorities can play an useful supporting role. 
They  have  an  important  signalling  function  and  easier  access  for  businesses  to  raise 
issues  related  to  the  DMA.  We  therefore  believe  that  the  involvement  of  national 
competition  authorities  should  be  included  in the  Digital Markets  Act (eg.  by  including 
them in the Digital Advisory Committee under Art 32 or via a reference to the European 
Competition Network (ECN)). In this sense, we believe that Member states should play 
a  more  important  role  in  the  enforcement  of  the  proposal  to  ensure  its  effectiveness. 
Activities such as complaint handling, remedy compliance and consultation undertaking 
could  be  carried  out  at  Member  State  level.  This  would  allow  to  free  Commission 
resources  for  the  more  strategic  tasks  required  by  the  DMA.  We  also  ask  for  the 
Commission for further clarity as to how the  Digital Advisory Committee will otherwise 
cooperate with the ECN. 
 
Finally, we would like to highlight the differences between the fines that can be utilised 
to enforce the DMA, at 10% of turnover under Art 26(1), when compared to those being 
proposed under the DSA at no more than 6% of turnover (Art 42) and existing under the 
GDPR, at 4% of turnover (Art 83). 
 
 
* * *