Detta är en HTML-version av en bilaga till begäran om allmän handling 'Digital Services Act / Digital Markets Act'.


 
 
January 2021 
 
Digital Markets Act 
Position paper 
 
Key messages 
 

● Schibsted welcomes the Commission's proposal and b
  elieves t hat i t w
  il c
  ontribute t o 
a  fairer  and  more  competitive  digital  economy.  The  proposed  obligations  for digital 
gatekeepers  wil   enable  digital  companies such as Schibsted to innovate, grow and 
develop new services for users in al  our markets. 
● We agree with the proposed approach to establish a combination o
  f clear q
  ualitative 
and  quantitative  criteria  for  defining  gatekeepers,  and  stress  the  need  to  ensure 
obligations  ful y  and  exclusively  target  only  those  gatekeepers  that  cause the most 
harm  to  the  digital market. To ensure legal certainty, it is important to be clear from 
the  outset  which  companies  wil   be  designated  as  gatekeepers  according  to  the 
Regulation. 
● We  support  the  proposal  to  specify  specific, self-executing obligations (Art.5) which 
could  al ow  remedies  to  be  introduced  quickly  and  efficiently,  in  particular  the 
obligations related to greater transparency in online advertising (Art.5(g)). 
● Some of the obligations in Article 6, such a
  s the obligation t o provide b
  usiness u
  sers 
with  their  own  customer  data  in  Art.6.6(i),  are  of  such  importance  for  Schibsted’s 
ability  to  develop  our  services  that  they  should  be  moved  to  Article  5  for  legal 
certainty and speedy implementation. 
● We concur that enforcement of the Regulation should take place a
  t t he E
  U l evel and 
is clearly in the hands of the EU Commission. However, we see a
  r
  isk that a
  l engthy 
designation process may lead to these rules not being applicable f or a l ong time. W
  e 
therefore support the use of interim measures (Art.22) for speedy adoption. 
 
Background 
Schibsted  is  a  family  of  digital  consumer  brands  based  in  the  Nordics  with  world-class 
Scandinavian  media  houses,  leading  classified marketplaces and tech start-ups in the field 
of  personal  finance  and  col aborative  economies.  ​Schibsted  constitutes  an  ecosystem  of 
various brands that offer different products and services to users and customers. W
  e u
  tilize 
data across t he e
  cosystem b
  oth to a
  ttract u
  sers a
  nd c
  ustomers, d
  evelop a
  nd p
  ersonalise o
  ur 
products and services as wel  as keep users and customers engaged.  
Giant  global  digital  platforms  are  at  the  heart  of  the  economy,  and  some  of  them  have 
become  digital  gatekeepers  that  – due to their size and scale – are able to set the rules in 
the  market  and  act  as  private  regulators  of  the  relationship  between  businesses  and their 
users.  Consumers  rely  on  the  gatekeepers  to  access  information  and  services,  and 
businesses need them to access users and user data, to promote services a
  nd g
  eneral y to 
operate more efficiently.  
 



 
 
Although  these  platforms  are  an  essential  part  of  the  economy  and  can  create  great 
business  opportunities,  valuable  innovation  and  useful  choices  for  consumers,  we 
experience unfair and uncompetitive practices in accessing data about our users on these  
 
platforms  and  lack  of  transparency  in  the  online  advertising  market  that  is  crucial  for  our 
income generation. 
We  are  therefore  very  supportive  of  the  proposal  for  a  Digital  Markets  Act  and  hope  that 
negotiations  wil   proceed  swiftly  to  al ow  the  Regulation  to  enter  into  force  and  deliver 
practical results as soon as possible. 
 
Scope 
 
We  are  of  the  opinion  that  the  scope  must  be  limited  only to those digital players that are 
truly  unavoidable  trading  partners  for  business  users  and  their  customers,  present  across 
vertical y-integrated  markets  across  a  majority  of  EU  Member  States.  These  gatekeepers 
exercise  a  market  power  that  gives  them  the  ability  to  charge  excessive 
intermediation/access  fees  and/or  exhibit  abusive  negotiation  power  by,  for  example, 
imposing unfair conditions on their business users.  
 
We  agree  with  the  proposed  qualitative  and  quantitative  criteria  in  the  draft  Regulation. 
Especial y  the  fact  that  gatekeepers  have  a  significant  impact  on  the  market  and  are 
unavoidable trading partners f or businesses t o reach t heir customers a
  re important e
  lements 
to  consider.  The  criteria  must  be  clear  and future-proof to prevent gatekeepers from either 
circumventing them by company arrangements or unreasonably chal enging or delaying t he 
designation process.  
 
We would support clarifications, for example, in the definition of “monthly active e

  nd 
users”  in  Art.  3.2.b  and  to  clarify  Article  3.2  (a)  so  that  the  undertaking  needs  to 
provide 
the same core platform service in at least three Member States.  
 
We  see  significant  risk  of  legal  uncertainty  in  slow,  lengthy  designation  procedures  and 
delegated  acts,  and this is a concern widely reflected by companies operating in the digital 
market.  The  process  laid  out  in  Articles  3.3-7  must  not  lead  to  a  lengthy  and 
overly-administrative  process  that  wil   delay  the  implementation  of  the  obligations  in  the 
Regulation.  
 
Obligations for gatekeepers (Articles 5 and 6) 
 
We  have  been  cal ing  for specific obligations on gatekeepers that are important to develop 
our  digital  services  and  to  stay  relevant  with  our  users.  In  particular  we  have  cal ed  for 
obligations  that  add predictability, fairness and transparency to the relationship between us 
as  a  business  user  and  the  gatekeepers,  but  also  obligations  that  ensure  that we can get 
access to our own customer data w
  hen o
  ur c
  ustomers a
  ccess our s
  ervices v
  ia a g
  atekeeper 
platform.  
 



 
 
We  are supportive of the proposed obligations in Article 5 and 6 and believe that these wil  
help level the playing field in the digital market.  
 
The  inclusion  of  the  obligations  in  the  DMA  are  particularly  important  for  the  ability  of 
companies like Schibsted to continue to grow and innovate:  
 
 
● (Article  5  (a)  -  refrain  from  ​combining  personal  data  sourced  from  these  core 
platform  services  with  personal  data  from  any  other  services  offered  by  the 
gatekeeper;  
● (Article  5  (g)  -  ​Transparency  for  advertisers  and  publishers  about  the  pricing 
and remuneration in advertising ​ services provided by the gatekeeper); 
● (Article 6.1 (a)) - refrain from ​u
  sing, i n c
  ompetition with b
  usiness u
  sers, a
  ny d
  ata 
not publicly available, which is generated through activities by those business users ;. 
● (Article  6.1  (d))  -  refrain  from  ​treating  more  favourably  in  ranking  services  and 
products offered by gatekeepers itself ; 
● (Article 6.1 (f)) - a
  l ow business u
  sers and ​providers o
  f a
  ncillary s
  ervices ​access t o 
and interoperability with the same operating system; 
● (Article 6.1 (g)) -
  ​p
  rovide a
  dvertisers a
  nd p
  ublishers, upon t
  heir r
  equest a
  nd f
  ree 
of charge, with access to the performance measuring tools 
● (Article  6.1  (i))  -  ​provide  business  users,  or  third  parties  authorised  by  a 
business user, access and use of their user data ​; 
● (Article  6.1  (k))  -  apply ​fair and ​non-discriminatory general conditions of access 
for business users to its software application store . 
In particular, Article 6.1(i) is i mportant f or Schibsted a
  s a d
  igital n
  ews p
  rovider. W
  e s
  el  digital 
subscriptions  through  app  stores  and  experience  problems  in  accessing  information about 
those  purchasing  the  subscription.  For  example,  Apple requires some of Schibsted’s news 
media  apps  to  exclusively  implement  Apple’s  payment  system  (IAP)  for  customers  to 
purchase  in-app  subscriptions.  Customers  purchasing  subscriptions  through  the  iOS  App 
Store  become  customers  of  Apple even though they are signing up to one of our services. 
As the news publisher, we are not a
  ble t o establish a c
  ustomer relationship a
  nd c
  annot o
  ffer 
relevant c
  ontent to t hem, h
  elp t hem via our c
  ustomer service o
  r u
  nderstand their p
  references 
to innovate and develop our products and services. 
It  is  of  utmost  importance  to us that we have access to data so that we can offer the most 
relevant content to our customers. We therefore m
  ust have free a
  ccess t o our o
  wn c
  ustomer 
data  and  be  able  to  decide  how  to  comply  with  legal  obligations  when  it  comes  to  the 
processing  of  our  user  data.  We  believe  that  gatekeepers  should  not  take  the  role  of 
regulators and dictate how we should comply with legal obligations. 
It  is  also  important  that  a  gatekeeper  that  is  active  in  multiple  markets  cannot  use  data 
generated on their platform to compete with other players in the same m
  arket. Wel a
  pplied, 
Article  6.1(a)  can  tackle  situations  where  a  gatekeeper  such  as  Google,  because  of  its 
dominant  position  in  search,  maintains  a lock on al  kinds of data generated by publishers, 
advertisers  and  other  intermediaries  to  maintain  its  dominant  position  across  the  broader 
digital  advertising  ecosystem.  It  can  also  prevent  gatekeeper  platforms  tying  separate 



 
 
products  and  services  to  their  core  platforms  and  favouring  their  own  services  to  the 
detriment  of  competitors.  For  example,  Facebook  has  artificial y  boosted  its  Facebook 
Marketplace  classifieds  service with unprecedented growth by leveraging its social network 
to drive ads and traffic to that service. 
We  also  support  greater  transparency  obligations  in  Articles  5(g)  and  6.1(g)  that  aim  to 
ensure publishers and advertisers have the possibility t o u
  nderstand m
  arket dynamics (
  such 
as  pricing)  and  access  performance  measurement  tools  in  the  online  advertising  chain. 
Today, Google can lock the YouTube ad inventory into its own advertising n
  etwork, t hereby 
hindering the development of alternative advertising networks. 
We  therefore  call  on  the  EU  institutions  to  maintain  these  obligations  in  the 
Regulation.  

Given the vital importance of the obligations set out in Articles 6.1(a), (g) and (i), and 
to  ensure  they  cannot  be  diluted  or  circumvented  in  the  process  of  ‘regulatory 
dialogue’, we propose these provisions are inserted in Article 5.  

Enforcement 
 
To avoid regulatory f ragmentation in the digital s
  ingle m
  arket, w
  e support e
  nforcement o
  f t he 
DMA at the EU level and in the hands of the EU Commission. We stress the importance of 
the  Commission  setting  aside  enough  resources  to  ensure  efficient  and  speedy 
implementation.